Feline Kidney Disease Diet

When a cat has Feline Leukemia, his immune system will be compromised. Apart from this, he also develops anemia and the growth of abnormal tumors. He develops other diseases such as cancer. He will most likely live around 3.5 more years, as a majority of FeLV-infected cats do.

If you are a cat care giver, it is essential for you to know how you can prevent the spread of the disease among cats in your foster cat home. Knowledge and understanding of the disease, as well as other contagious diseases, can certainly be a big factor in lengthening the lives of cats.

Licking is one of the common forms of transmission as FeLV can be acquired through licking. Moreover, placenta-transmission (i.e. mother to baby) is also another common form. Kittens are more vulnerable to the condition because their immune system are still weak until they reach 4 months old, thus resistance to the disease is also not that strong.

The sad truth is that it takes awhile for symptoms to become evident. In fact, it could take months, or even years, before the symptoms show. Unless you get your cat tested, it is unlikely that you will find out if he has FeLV during the first few months that he has it.

How can you keep your cats safe from this rather deadly disease? Below are some of the things that you can do. Actually, these are what you SHOULD do, if you want to keep your cats free from FeLV, and this is particularly important if you have a foster cat home.

  • First, keep your infected cats separate from healthy ones.
  • Second, have your cats vaccinated. But before you do so, please bear in mind that the vaccines do not work for all cats.
  • Third, test your cats, especially those that you own (if you have a foster cat home).
  • Fourth, do not get more cats until the preceding fostered cats already have new owners.
  • Fifth, make sure feeding plates are separated and always disinfected.
  • Sixth, clean and disinfect their litter box at least two times a week.
  • Lastly, if an FeLV-infected cat gets a new home, see to it that you inform the new owner of the cat’s condition and educate him on how he can take care of the cat.

If you are a foster cat caregiver, you are taking on a huge responsibility of ensuring that the cats are kept healthy. This is particularly important if you also have your own cats, on top of the foster cats. Always see to it that you have your cats tested for FeLV and other transmittable diseases.

You run the risk of spreading diseases if you have many cats in your home but if you have a good understanding on the dos and don’ts, then you should not have a problem keeping every cat safe and healthy. Additionally, you might also want to consider getting cat health insurance plan as the management of feline cancer or other diseases brought about by Feline Leukemia entails costs that may really hurt your budget.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Our vet told us that diet treatment is the best and only method to treat feline kidney disease. Is this true?
    She just told us to keep feeding our cat Hill’s KD food, and that there was really no other option that would treat the condition just as well. Is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      No it is not and you should go to the group linked below this post. That food is just asking for more trouble.
      Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure

      If your cat is not in final stages, this is not want you want to do. You do not want to put your cat on the
      Vets low protein diet. There are simply so many better options out there than to hand the poor cat a low amount of poor quality protein – which often results in a poor appetite and muscle wasting since the body is now robbing its own muscle mass to feed itself a decent quality and amount of protein.
      . There are new thoughts on this and the thinking is it is not the amount of protein but the quality of protein that matters.
      The Merck veterinary manual [www.merckvetmanual.com] says that cats need “4 g of protein of high biologic value per kg body wt/day”. That’s about 7 calories from protein per pound body weight per day. If a cat isn’t a good eater and consumes, say, 20 calories per pound per day, then 7/20 = 35% of calories can safely be from protein. It must be high quality protein, which means meat, fish, milk, and eggs, and not grain or soy.

      I am under the assumption that you have been feeding mostly dry foods. Many use a vegetable based protein instead of animal and that is part of the problem.. Your cat needs protein as it is a carnivore and cutting down on it will lead to other health issues and may cause faster degeneration.
      You want to cut down on phosphorous (no fish allowed now)

      The best way to do this is with a raw diet which you can make yourself or buy. (Making yourself is better) link provided at the bottom
      If you are unwilling to do that then something like the non fish flavors of Wellness or Merrick with NO grains are good alternatives. Wysong is also a good canned choice. This list gives a breakdown. Remember you want low phosphorous

      http://webpages.charter.net/katkarma/can…

      You should be giviung sub-q fluids as needed

      You also will want to look into phosphorous binders. Something like aluminum hydroxide
      Ask your vet or look into calcitrol

      You may want to talk to the vet about having injectable Pepcid AC on hand or you can buy it in pill form (ac not plain pepcid) and give 1/4 tab for stomach upset which happens a lot in crf cats due to acid in the stomach.
      I hope this stuff helps, here are many links for you
      Making cat food

      http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm

      other links. Read, read, read!!!!

      http://www.felineoutreach.org/EducationD…

      http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_chr…

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

      http://www.felinecrf.com/

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Felin…

      About that vets diet. This report is for dogs but applies to cats

      http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/21…

  2. QUESTION:
    Feline Kidney Disease-what does it look like in an older cat?
    My 17 year old cat went to the vet because she was dinking a lot of water. The vet did some tests said she had kidney disease ad suggested a change in her diet. I changed to his suggested food and she would not eat it and lost weight. I gave up and went back to the food she likes. Now I notice that her bottom is wet most of the time and she has long hair so this is not pleasant. She still uses the litter box, why is there urine in her fur? What does kidney failure look like?
    How do I know when to let her go to kitty heaven?

    • ANSWER:
      The following websites will help you in your search for education on how to care for your cat with CRF

      http://www.holisticat.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80%3Acrf&catid=76%3Achronic-&Itemid=112&limitstart=2

      http://www.felinecrf.com/

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of Feline diabetes or kidney failure? I am worried about my kitty?
    I am going to call and see if the vet can get me in tomorrow, but here is what has gone on so far:
    My cat is is a 10 year old Manx. He has always been small but the last few weeks he is practically skeletal, I can feel every bone in his spine and hips. I weighed him yesterday and he was 7.5 lbs. He is an indoor/outdoor cat, and at first I thought it was just worms so I gave him a de-wormer about 1 1/2 weeks ago, and another follow up pill yesterday. It was “Drontal Plus”. He seems to be in really good spirits, and is acting practically normal, although I don’t usually see him as often as I do now because I am keeping him indoors for now. He is still playing, and cuddling. He doesn’t seem to be eating much at all, so I got him some a/d® Canine/Feline science diet food, which is a high calorie supplement. He ate about 1/2 can of that today. I have been reading a lot of scary things on the internet about diabetes and kidney disease, and it seems like he is drinking more water than normal. Do you think he could be drinking more because of the de-wormer, or is it a high possibility that he has a serious disease? Would he be acting normal if he did? He is up to date on all of his shots. I realize that I probably will not get a proper diagnosis on yahoo Answers, but what do you guys think?
    He turned out to be diabetic :(

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, drinking a lot and urinating a lot are symptoms of both. and yes at first it might be possible that they otherwise seem normal. That’s why it is good you are getting your cat buddy into the vet tomorrow.
      With kidney disease another common thing would be vomiting, maybe vomiting sort of clear or foamy fluid. also loss of appetite and thus weight loss.

      With diabetes, past a certain point, there is increase in appetite but even if they eat more. they lose weight . The coat gets dry and dandruffy. and then they might start getting weak in their legs. (from neuropathy — that is often reversible)

      If it’s diabetes it is very treatable, in fact many cats who are treated soon and get their blood sugar under control are able to go into remission and just be diet controlled. others only need a diet change to start with and that controls it.
      Even kidney disease seems to have come a long way and many cats are living years with it.

      Hang on to the following links.
      if he has diabetes check outhttp://felinediabetes.com/ , they have a lot of info on there and connected with the site is a very very active message board FDMB http://www.felinediabetes.com/FDMB/

      If it turns out to be kidney disease….There are 2 great sites that have been around a long time with tons of info. one is US one is UK so there is some country specific info but most applies to all cats

      http://www.felinecrf.com

      and http://www.felinecrf.org
      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-CRF-Support/ yahoo discussion list for people whose cats have kidney disease. You will probably find a lot of support and tips there.

  4. QUESTION:
    I need help understanding/interpreting feline blood test results. No guessing please.?
    I took my 13 yr old cat to the vet last week because she is having labored breathing. She seems fine, not distressed, eating fine but her breathing sounds bad and her sides retract each time she breathes. She was breathing very quick shallow breaths. The vet said it was asthma but wanted to do xrays and blood tests to be sure. Her blood test results were as follows:

    Test Result Reference Range Indicator
    ALB = 3.1 g/dL 2.3-3.9 Normal
    ALKP = 36 U/L 14-111 Normal
    ALT < 10U/L 12-130 No graph shown
    AMYL = 573 U/L 500-1500 Normal (at the low end of normal)
    BUN = 16 mg/dL 16-36 Low (on the line for low/normal, vet says Low)
    Ca = 9.1 mg/dL 7.8-11.3 Normal
    CHOL = 126 mg/dL 65-225 Normal
    CREA = 2.3 mg/dL 0.8-2.4 High? (inside the "normal" box but towards high end,
    vet says "High")
    GLOB = 3.7 g/dL 2.8-5.1 Normal
    GLU = 155 mg/dL 71-159 High (line between normal/high, vet says not a
    concern, it's just high because she's scared
    or nervous)
    PHOS = 5.1 mg/dL 3.1-7.5 Normal
    TBIL < 0.1 mg/dL 0.0-0.9 No graph shown
    TP = 6.8 g/dL 5.7-8.9 Normal

    HCT = 37.9% 24.0-45.0 Normal
    HGB = 11.5 g/dL 8.0-15.0 Normal
    MCHC = 30.3 g/dL 30.0-36.9 Low (line between low/normal)
    WBC = 25.2 x10^9/L 5.0-18.9 High
    GRANS = 22.0 x10^9/L 2.5-12.5 High
    %GRANS =87%
    L/M =3.2 x10^9/L 1.5-7.8 Normal
    %L/M = 13%
    PLT = 46 x10^9/L 175-500 Low
    Retics ~ 0.6%

    Her vet said she has CRF/kidney disease and told me to start her on Hill's Prescription Diet or if she wouldn't eat that (said a lot of cats won't) a recipe she gave me that consisted of liver, calcium carbonate, eggs and vegetable oil immediately. She said based on her creatinine levels my cat was in the 3rd of 4 stages and her kidneys would fail quickly if I continued with her current diet. She made it clear that I needed to start feeding her the new diet immediately. My cat won't eat it, any of it. She's always been a very picky eater. I went back and asked for a can of the prescription food, the vet tech sold me a can of a/d critical care formula, she ate this. I went back to get more and the vet said it was not good for her kidneys :^/ That she has to eat the k/d formula. I bought this and she won't touch it. I even tried adding tuna juice and she won't touch it.

    While researching what else she can eat, I noticed that her blood test results don't seem to be consistent with CRF test results. ie: her BUN is low/normal not high, HCT is normal, PHOS is normal

    I am wondering if anyone that knows veterinary medicine can answer this for me. I'm extremely concerned because she was eating fine before the diet change even with the labored breathing, now she won't eat any of the k/d foods and not more than a bite or two of anything else. The vet says if she won't eat the kidney diet to add water and force feed it to her from a squeeze bottle. This seems counterproductive (and painful for me, she doesn't like being force-anything) if she isn't in kidney failure. If she is, then I would really appreciate suggestions on alternatives to the aforementioned k/d food (tried can and dry) and the k/d liver recipe that she won't eat.

    She has had antibiotic and steroid shots for the lung infection. Plus the vet prescribed liquid antibiotics and probiotic paste to take home. My cat would let me give her the antibiotics to begin with because she didn't have much "fight" in her. Now she has it back and is fighting me when I give her the antibiotic. She won't touch the probiotic or any food that I put it in, even tuna (the bribe food/her fave). I've also been putting her in a crate and giving her albuterol nebulizer treatments followed by percussions. Her breathing is better than it was. But her respirations while laying down/resting are 55-60 breaths per minute.
    Vet did xrays because she felt "lumps" in her hind legs. Turned out to be nothing. The xrays did show "something" in her lungs (two hazy spots, one at the top edge of right lung and one on the towards the edge of the left lung) but the doctor said with her age she doesn't recommend surgery to find out if it is something "bad" or not. Just do antibiotics/nebs/percussions
    JC: Thank you so much for your reply. I appreciate you taking the time to read my entire question and to give an informed answer. She is family. I've had her since she was a tiny kitten and she means the world to me. My gut told me that something wasn't right with her diagnosis. Especially when she was looking at the xrays. She went up to the light board and stared at it, then moved really close and stared again for a bit and then said "there's something here..and here" pointing at the very light hazy spots but didn't tell me what that meant until I asked for more information. So, no, she did not send them to a radiologist. I had taken her in because of the breathing and she also had a hard spot under one of her nipples. We got a dog last year, so for the past year she doesn't live in my lap like she always has. Needless to say, when I was holding her, I felt the "tough" spot on her tummy/under the nipple. The vet seemed somewhat unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that
    unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that it was a "mammary tumor" which seems like something to be concerned about. She said if it gets any bigger to bring her back, but that was that. Velvet has always been a very healthy fiesty girl (she's a Russian Blue) but in the last couple of years she developed a small lump over her front right shoulder, it looks/feels like fluid filled skin, I was told by everyone this is nothing to be concerned about especially since it doesn't hurt her in the least to touch it, press it, etc. The vet said it wasn't anything to worry about either, just due to her getting older. She did say that because of the lumps in her legs and the hard spot in her tummy we should do xrays to make sure it wasn't a tumor in her lungs causing the breathing problems. I asked about the legs, because she didn't even mention them when reviewing the xray. She said "it's nothing, if it was, I would have told you".

    I was terrified when I went in. She seems to have

    • ANSWER:
      Time to find a new vet.

      Those aren’t the kidney numbers of a CRF cat. A better predictor of kidney health is to test the specific gravity of the urine – if it’s concentrated, the kidneys are functioning properly, if it’s too dilute, they are starting to age. The reduced kidney function is one of aging, and not a disease. A cat’s body craves and needs protein – that is why she is instinctively rejecting the K/D. Very few vets will prescribe a low-protein diet for cats with aging kidneys – they 1) won’t eat it 2) it leads to muscle wasting (the body needs to get protein from somewhere!) and 3) it hasn’t been proven that low-protein slows down the progression of the CRF. What she needs is to eat – a high quality canned food free of by-products and chemical preservatives. That’s what my vet recommends, based on the latest research. The by-products are hard to digest, and the chemicals are tough on the kidneys. Good canned foods will keep her better hydrated, and slow down the aging of the kidneys.

      Did the vet send the xrays out for a ‘real’ radiologist to interpret? Cats with asthma – untreated – can get hard spots in their lungs, and those will show up on xrays. It takes a real radiologist to interpret an xray – the answer is NOT surgery to find out what it is, it’s to have a qualified person read and interpret the xray. Personal story – my rescue rex was coughing prior to his coming to me, and was taken to the vet who did a chest xray, and diagnosed severe hear disease and wanted to do ultrasounds, etc. I insisted that the xrays were to be sent to a radiologist – diagnosis was asthma. Quite a bit different than the vet’s diagnosis of an aorta ready to self destruct.

      CRF is not a death sentence. And yours isn’t there yet. Feeding her a food she can’t stand is counterproductive, and can lead to liver failure when she refuses to eat. Find another vet, and feed her a quality canned food so that the poor thing eats! At 13 – with that pretty good bloodwork – she should have some good quality years left to spend with you.

  5. QUESTION:
    BARF diet for Cats…anyone?
    I have a male adult cat who has been troubled by a horrible illness called Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) I was told by the vet he’d end up with cancer in the colon. Yes, he had chronic colitis, a problem in the large intestine which was causing my pet bleed through the rectum and horrible, nonstop diarrhea. My kitty was getting weary of his suffering and I was getting so, so tired of throwing away bed sheets, cleaning after him every day sometimes 2 times a day. I could not sleep well just thinking of what else I could have possibly found dirty in the house. He never went outside the box, but all that blood, with colon mucose coming out he could not control. My cat got to a point where he could not sit down comfortably, and there was bloody diarrhea in his tail, kitchen counter, tables, furniture etc ALL THE TIME.

    I did not want to watch my cat give up and not do anything, so I did some research and finally switched him to a species appropriate diet: cooked or raw meat with bones, organs and probiotics and digestive enzymes. I now am keeping all my cats on the BARF diet, always making sure I get fresh food from animals which were not cured or injected with substances to keep the meat fresh. I also make sure to keep the phosphorus-calcium ratio right, and it’s been a year now since I have not seen signs of IBD. My cat’s stools are formed and healthy. My vet says my cat looks incredibly fine.

    So, I just wanted to see how many follow this diet and what you think of it. I am aware of the risks, like toxoplasmosis, but my cat was dying in front of my eyes on Science Diet, Purina, Iams, Prescription foods like Hill’s z/d etc, and many, many more expensive commercial foods and not one helped my poor feline. He was on antibiotics and prednisone all the time and nothing ever worked! So, I learned that cats are obligate carnivores and need to eat other animals to live a better life. I have noticed too many cases of IBD, Diabetes, Obesity, UTI, Kidney Disease, and cancer, all because we’re feeding species inappropriate foods to our precious pets. The number of sick ones keeps increasing, and we are responsible.

    Anyone trying out this diet? I’d love to hear some of your experiences.
    If anyone is interested, this website I’m about to provide is one of the best and I am a client of them. I encourage everybody to take a look. Their service is high quality. Thank you ladies!

    www.hare-today.com

    • ANSWER:
      When I first was investigating the raw diets I was on groups where people reported that many cats would be “cured” of IBD within 48 hours. I have had no experience of that with my cats so I’m happy to hear another testimonial to the efficacy of a raw meat diet for cat health.

      I too only do a 50% raw diet. Right now I am down to my last frozen “muffin” of raw chicken. No hearts at the store today. When I called the market where I get my turkey parts last week they had just cleaned out the turkeys and thrown away the hearts and livers to use with the turkey.

      Also, having acquired two kittens this summer I am going through the raw meat mixture at double the speed I am used to.

      I do think the diet has extraordinary benefits for cat health.

  6. QUESTION:
    FLUTD cat food recommendations / options? any VETS? people with long time experience? (long question)?
    one of my cats has FLUTD. my vet told me (and has repeatedly told me) that the only food they recommend feeding him at all is Hills PRESCRIPTION (not science) Diet Feline c/d dry food, which can only be purchased at a veterinary clinic, because it lowers the pH of his urine because of its low magnesium.

    I’ve read elsewhere and have been told by other people (not veterinarians though) many different things including:

    1. that dry food contributes to the problem by removing hydration from the cats sytem?
    2. that Hills Prescription Diet contains mostly grains?
    3. that removing magnesium from foods is not the best solution, as cats may need some magnesium?

    my concern is that if any of the things people are telling me are correct, and I’m buying food vets get paid to sell, I could be shortening his lifespan when my intention is to keep him alive and happy as long as possible.

    he’s eaten Prescription c/d for at least 4 years and has had no health problems while on it, after almost dying from crystal blockage and barely avoiding kidney damage from eating Purina Cat Chow (not saying Purina is dangerous, my cat has a disease). I got him to resume drinking water by buying a cat fountain because he was afraid to drink, and it took a week to get him to eat the Prescription c/d for the first time. but 4 years now.

    a pet shop owner gave me samples of a few different products (but she also told me to continue buying Hills Prescription Feline c/d as she thinks it helps), some of the products being: dry Taste Of The Wild feline formula, dry Felidae, wet Wellness Healthy Indulgence packets (she had no dry Wellness). she also told me what others have: that moisure/water is the best because it can prevent the crystals from forming and the infections from coming back. she said cats are desert animals and naturally resist water, so wet food is best.

    so far my plan is: continue feeding Hills Prescription c/d, buy Wellness wet Healthy Indulgence packets to give him more liquids.

    anyone have any experience with this situation? what do you feed your cat, and how long has it worked?

    • ANSWER:
      My cat, Kiwi, developed stress-related FLUTD. He is a typical case- 3 year old adult male indoor cat, overweight about 10%.
      Vet recommended feeding any of the following: Royal Canin S/O kibbles and pouches (mine loves both), Hill’s C/D (kitty likes it, but not as much as RC), and Purina D/M cans (kitty likes these a little more than Hills).
      If you can afford feeding canned exclusively- go for it.
      If not, the only kibble I feed Kiwi now is the Royal Canin S/O; it’s formulated so neither oxalate nor struvite crystals will form. He loves it, though, so his weight-loss diet isn’t working so well…
      As for my other kitties, I feed grain free, or, rice as the only cereal grain. Wellness, California Naturals, Royal Canin Rabbit and Green Pea, Veterinarian Formulation Chicken and Rice (from Arkat in Arkansas) etc. are all favorites. I give them a variety, so any little flaw in one formulation doesn’t have the chance to cause long-term health issues. My cats range from 2 to 15 years old, and all are doing great.

  7. QUESTION:
    FLUTD – My cat’s urinating blood?
    I have two cats; calico females age 8, sisters from the same litter. Strictly dry food diet, one litter box – automated scooping with crystals.

    Three weeks ago I noticed odd behavior from my kitty, Snickers. She was going into the litter box more frequently with little to no urine. She didn’t seem to be in any pain or discomfort and her attitude was the same. After doing some online research and speaking with a breeder friend of mine, I started homeopathic treatment. Bought new organic high-quality dry and canned food, meat and rice based, instead of meat-meal and corn based. I also bought cranberry capsules from the health food store and made parsley infused water (boiled 1 qt water with 1 bunch parsley, strained and cooled).

    I started integrating the new dry food over the next week and immediately started feeding her canned food twice daily making it into a soup with lots of extra water and the cranberry capsules. I also force feed her the parsley infused water with a dropper 2-3 times a day. I did this for ten days and started to notice an improvement. Urinating more and less frequently.

    After the ten days of treatment, I stopped feeding her canned food and put her back on dry food only, but the new dry food. Five days after the end of treatment, her symptoms returned. So I started her back on canned food with cranberry capsules and took her to the vet on Monday to have a urinalysis completed to make sure there’s no infection or blockage. They put her on IV fluids and kept her for the day. When she came home that night, she started urinating blood and has ever since.

    The test results came back yesterday… no infection or bacteria, no crystals or blockage, but lots of blood. The doctor says it’s FLUTD Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease and it should resolve itself within 7-10 days. It’s typically caused by stress and can be treated with pain reliever until the bleeding stops. If it does not resolve itself, their next suggestion would be an x-ray to determine in there’s any stones in her bladder/kidney, which they say is not too common. They say keep the litter box clean, her environment comfortable, and monitor her urine.

    I read online that changing the diet can be beneficial as well. Most places say no dry food at all, only wet food twice a day. Encourage water intake. Reduce stress. And try antioxidant vitamins and herbs.

    I’m very concerned for her health and safety and I hate that she can’t tell me how she feels. The doctor didn’t seem to think it’s a big deal and really only recommended a pain reliever. But she doesn’t act like she’s in pain, so will it help anything?

    We’re leaving for vacation this Saturday for 7 days. My neighbor and mom will be there to check on her, but I feel horrible leaving not knowing if she’s okay and if I’m doing everything I can to help her. PLEASE any suggestions or advice would be so greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.

    • ANSWER:
      The best cure for FLUTD is water. Cats developed as as desert species, so they are designed to derive most of their liquid intake through the bodies of prey animals. This means that their thirst instinct is not well developed, so even if they do have a good source of nice fresh water, they still may not drink enough to keep them well hydrated. Dry food, as you may now understand, is deficient in one nutrient, and that one nutrient is water. To help your kitty get over her FLUTD, feeding her canned food is a good start. I know that when my boy cat had FLUTD, even buying the prescription formula foods did not do the trick 100%. What really did help, though, was feeding him high quality canned food, and mixing in some extra water into the food.

      Here is a well-researched article on the topic, be sure to scroll down, because it was posted in a threaded forum, and is longer than a single post. And some of the comments on it got interspersed with the main article. http://catfood.tribe.net/thread/8db33940-373d-4063-88e6-e57c0e1e5f29


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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Our vet told us that diet treatment is the best and only method to treat feline kidney disease. Is this true?
    She just told us to keep feeding our cat Hill’s KD food, and that there was really no other option that would treat the condition just as well. Is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      No it is not and you should go to the group linked below this post. That food is just asking for more trouble.
      Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure

      If your cat is not in final stages, this is not want you want to do. You do not want to put your cat on the
      Vets low protein diet. There are simply so many better options out there than to hand the poor cat a low amount of poor quality protein – which often results in a poor appetite and muscle wasting since the body is now robbing its own muscle mass to feed itself a decent quality and amount of protein.
      . There are new thoughts on this and the thinking is it is not the amount of protein but the quality of protein that matters.
      The Merck veterinary manual [www.merckvetmanual.com] says that cats need “4 g of protein of high biologic value per kg body wt/day”. That’s about 7 calories from protein per pound body weight per day. If a cat isn’t a good eater and consumes, say, 20 calories per pound per day, then 7/20 = 35% of calories can safely be from protein. It must be high quality protein, which means meat, fish, milk, and eggs, and not grain or soy.

      I am under the assumption that you have been feeding mostly dry foods. Many use a vegetable based protein instead of animal and that is part of the problem.. Your cat needs protein as it is a carnivore and cutting down on it will lead to other health issues and may cause faster degeneration.
      You want to cut down on phosphorous (no fish allowed now)

      The best way to do this is with a raw diet which you can make yourself or buy. (Making yourself is better) link provided at the bottom
      If you are unwilling to do that then something like the non fish flavors of Wellness or Merrick with NO grains are good alternatives. Wysong is also a good canned choice. This list gives a breakdown. Remember you want low phosphorous

      http://webpages.charter.net/katkarma/can…

      You should be giviung sub-q fluids as needed

      You also will want to look into phosphorous binders. Something like aluminum hydroxide
      Ask your vet or look into calcitrol

      You may want to talk to the vet about having injectable Pepcid AC on hand or you can buy it in pill form (ac not plain pepcid) and give 1/4 tab for stomach upset which happens a lot in crf cats due to acid in the stomach.
      I hope this stuff helps, here are many links for you
      Making cat food

      http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm

      other links. Read, read, read!!!!

      http://www.felineoutreach.org/EducationD…

      http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_chr…

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

      http://www.felinecrf.com/

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Felin…

      About that vets diet. This report is for dogs but applies to cats

      http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/21…

  2. QUESTION:
    What are some good sites/brands for feline renal diet cat food? My cat needs a wide variety & eats only dry?
    My cat has chronic renal (kidney) failure and often gets sick of his food. It’s really important that he eats. Any good sites that have a wide variety of renal diet cat food? I would buy a bunch of different kinds and keep switching it around. He won’t eat canned, only dry.

    If you don’t know any sites can you tell me what brand you’ve personally given to your cat? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to get him off the dry food. It’s like pouring gasoline on a fire to feed him that. My cat also has CRF. When we first found out, the vet gave him Hill’s K/D. He hated the food and I hated the fact it was so low in protein. I decided to feed him better protein instead of less so I tried Wellness. It worked wonders. I now do a rotation of Wellness, EVO, and Blue Buffalo. He has made remarkable improvements with it.

  3. QUESTION:
    Which kidney diet appears to be the best?
    ROYAL CANIN Veterinary Diet™ feline Renal LP™ Pouch
    Link: http://www.royalcanin.us/adx/aspx/adxGetMedia.aspx?DocID=134,293,12,1,Documents&MediaID=3555&Filename=FelineRenal.pdf

    Water, chicken by-products, meat by-products, corn flour, vegetable oil, chicken, corn starch, natural flavors, trace minerals (calcium carbonate, potassium chloride, zinc
    sulfate, manganese sulfate, copper sulfate), guar gum, taurine, vitamins (choline chloride, DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate [source of vitamin E], niacin, riboflavin [vitamin B2],
    thiamine mononitrate [vitamin B1], D-calcium pantothenate, vitamin D3 supplement, biotin, pyridoxine hydrochloride [vitamin B6], folic acid, vitamin B12 supplement).

    ———————————————————————————-

    Purina Veterinary Diets® NF® brand feline formula
    Link: http://www.purinaveterinarydiets.com/FelineProductDetail.aspx?prod=235

    Ingredients (Canned)

    Water sufficient for processing, liver, beef, poultry by-products, trout, rice, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), ground yellow corn, animal digest, pea fiber, wheat flour, calcium carbonate, potassium citrate, fish oil, potassium chloride, magnesium citrate, taurine, choline chloride, ferrous sulfate, zinc sulfate, Vitamin E supplement, niacin, thiamine mononitrate, manganese sulfate, copper sulfate, calcium pantothenate, Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, biotin, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, sodium selenite, menadione sodium bisulfite complex.

    My cat doesn’t like the Hills K/D, so hat’s why it’s not included.

    • ANSWER:
      Personally if my cat was diagnosed with kidney disease I would be feeding it Wysong. Hills, Purina and Royal Canin are full of corn and by-products, which I definitely don’t want to be feeding my cat. If you have to choose between the Purina and the Royal Canin, I would go with the Royal Canin as it is slightly better quality. I suggest you look into Wysong Rx diets as an alternative.

  4. QUESTION:
    what kinds of herbs are good for feline cystitis or kidney stones?
    i have a cat who urine with blood his abdomen its enlarge because he eats a lot of bread he adores sugar, i dont know if the cystitis its a consequence of his diet, i have to go to the vet I have an a ppointment this saturday. but in the meantime he is taking horse tail, I just need some herbs sugestions for my cat cystitis, when my cat take antibiotics he got sicki so i need some herbs for fabrizio my sweet cat.

    • ANSWER:
      What you need is to learn about nutrtiion. What you are feeding is the problem and you are shortening your cat’s life span

      Nutrition since there are so many bad things out there is very important to your cat’s health
      Contrary to what you may have heard; dry foods are not a great thing to feed a cat.
      Please read the label on what you are feeding? What are the ingredients? Do you know what they mean? Is the first ingrediant a muscle meat like chicken or meal or other things?

      http://www.catinfo.org/#Learn_How_To_Read_a_Pet_Food_Ingredient_Label

      http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/Spring04/Perhach/PetFood/InterpretingLabels.htm

      Dry foods are the number 1 cause of diabetes in cats as well as being a huge contributing factor to kidney disease, obesity, crystals, u.t.i’s and a host of other problems. Food allergies are very common when feeding dry foods. Rashes, scabs behind the tail and on the chin are all symptoms
      The problems associated with Dry food is that they are loaded with grains and carbohydrates which many cats (carnivores) cannot process. Also, Most of the moisture a cat needs is suppose to be in the food but in
      Dry, 95% of it is zapped out of dry foods in the processing. Another thing, most use horrible ingredients and don’t use a muscle meat as the primary ingredient and use vegetable based protein versus animal. Not good for an animal that has to eat meat to survive.

      http://www.catinfo.org/#My_Cat_is_Doing_Just_Fine_on_Dry_Food

      You want to pick a canned food w/o gravy (gravy=carbs) that uses a muscle meat as the first ingredient and doesn’t have corn at least in the first 3 ingredients if at all.
      THE BEST CAT FOODS CONTAIN NO GRAINS NO BYPOODUCTS NO MEAL
      Cats are meat eaters not cereal or rice eaters
      Fancy feast is a middle grade food with 9lives, friskies whiskas lower grade canned and wellness and merrick upper grade human quality foods. I would rather feed a middle grade canned food then the top of the line dry food.
      Also, dry food is not proven to be better for teeth. Does a hard pretzel clean your teeth or do pieces of it get stuck? http://www.felinefuture.com/nutrition/bpo_ch4a.php

      Please read about cat nutrition.

      http://www.catinfo.org/

      http://www.catinfo.org/feline_obesity.htm

      http://maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm#Dry_Food_vs_Canned_Food.__Which_is_reall

      Vetinarian diets The reason your vet thinks so highly of the pet food they sell probably has more to do with money than nutrition. In vet school, the only classes offered on nutrition usually last a few weeks, and are taught by representatives from the pet food companies. Vet students may also receive free food for their own dogs and cats at home. They could get an Iams notebook, a Purina purse and some free pizza. http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/Spring04/Perhach/PetFood/Vets.htm

  5. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of Feline diabetes or kidney failure? I am worried about my kitty?
    I am going to call and see if the vet can get me in tomorrow, but here is what has gone on so far:
    My cat is is a 10 year old Manx. He has always been small but the last few weeks he is practically skeletal, I can feel every bone in his spine and hips. I weighed him yesterday and he was 7.5 lbs. He is an indoor/outdoor cat, and at first I thought it was just worms so I gave him a de-wormer about 1 1/2 weeks ago, and another follow up pill yesterday. It was “Drontal Plus”. He seems to be in really good spirits, and is acting practically normal, although I don’t usually see him as often as I do now because I am keeping him indoors for now. He is still playing, and cuddling. He doesn’t seem to be eating much at all, so I got him some a/d® Canine/Feline science diet food, which is a high calorie supplement. He ate about 1/2 can of that today. I have been reading a lot of scary things on the internet about diabetes and kidney disease, and it seems like he is drinking more water than normal. Do you think he could be drinking more because of the de-wormer, or is it a high possibility that he has a serious disease? Would he be acting normal if he did? He is up to date on all of his shots. I realize that I probably will not get a proper diagnosis on yahoo Answers, but what do you guys think?
    He turned out to be diabetic :(

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, drinking a lot and urinating a lot are symptoms of both. and yes at first it might be possible that they otherwise seem normal. That’s why it is good you are getting your cat buddy into the vet tomorrow.
      With kidney disease another common thing would be vomiting, maybe vomiting sort of clear or foamy fluid. also loss of appetite and thus weight loss.

      With diabetes, past a certain point, there is increase in appetite but even if they eat more. they lose weight . The coat gets dry and dandruffy. and then they might start getting weak in their legs. (from neuropathy — that is often reversible)

      If it’s diabetes it is very treatable, in fact many cats who are treated soon and get their blood sugar under control are able to go into remission and just be diet controlled. others only need a diet change to start with and that controls it.
      Even kidney disease seems to have come a long way and many cats are living years with it.

      Hang on to the following links.
      if he has diabetes check outhttp://felinediabetes.com/ , they have a lot of info on there and connected with the site is a very very active message board FDMB http://www.felinediabetes.com/FDMB/

      If it turns out to be kidney disease….There are 2 great sites that have been around a long time with tons of info. one is US one is UK so there is some country specific info but most applies to all cats

      http://www.felinecrf.com

      and http://www.felinecrf.org
      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-CRF-Support/ yahoo discussion list for people whose cats have kidney disease. You will probably find a lot of support and tips there.

  6. QUESTION:
    Are there any non prescription alternatives to Hills Prescription Diet Feline k/d with no by-products? or tips
    My old lady cat MOCA, 16 =^./.^= was just tested & the vet wants me to buy her the Hills k/d products only available at the vet. I do not agree with by-products in my pet products & also do not agree with a product that you can only buy at the vets office.
    Are there any suggestions as alternatives to foods that would support kidney failure? It is lower in protein & there must be some other ingredients that support kidney function.
    Are there any recommended products to increase the longevity of older cats? She is living with 2-3 other (1 lives at 2 houses) cats who are young, 1 1/2 , so I am also not sure how I will be able to keep their food separate.
    Any cat tips would be appreciated too.
    Peace!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Peace!

      There is a Yahoo group that specializes on taking car of kitties with CRF (Chronic Renal Failure) and related issues. I think there are alos several on-line blogs groups that do the same. You may benefit greatly from their combined experiences with kitties with kidney and bladder issues. You’ll get first hand anecdotal experience, tips, guidelines, alerts, etc. Here are some links that discuss CRF:
      www.holisticat.com/crf
      www.marvistavet.com/html/body_chronic_renal_failure

      Sorry about your kitty, but I hear CRF can be managed with proper diet and vigilance.

  7. QUESTION:
    Feline Kidney Disease-what does it look like in an older cat?
    My 17 year old cat went to the vet because she was dinking a lot of water. The vet did some tests said she had kidney disease ad suggested a change in her diet. I changed to his suggested food and she would not eat it and lost weight. I gave up and went back to the food she likes. Now I notice that her bottom is wet most of the time and she has long hair so this is not pleasant. She still uses the litter box, why is there urine in her fur? What does kidney failure look like?
    How do I know when to let her go to kitty heaven?

    • ANSWER:
      The following websites will help you in your search for education on how to care for your cat with CRF

      http://www.holisticat.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80%3Acrf&catid=76%3Achronic-&Itemid=112&limitstart=2

      http://www.felinecrf.com/

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

  8. QUESTION:
    Some questions about feline kidney failure.?
    I’ve done some research on my own about it, and I’m getting conflicting results about whether lower protein or lower phosphorus is best for cats with renal failure. I asked a Vet Tech I know what her advise was, and she said lower protein, since it’s harder to metabolize than phosphorus is. Following her advise, I’ve been giving my cat Authority wet cat food, which is lower in protein than the other available food. I have her on Science Diet hairball control for mature cats for her dry food. The vet wanted me to put her on Hill’s prescription diet. I’m planning on getting some of that wet food tomorrow..
    So I guess to shorten it down..
    -Which is more important for cats with kidney failure, low protein, or low phosphorus? If both, what are some brands that have low amounts of both?
    -Is the Hill’s prescription diet a good one?
    -If I use the Hill’s prescription diet for both wet and dry food, will it be safe to feed my other, healthy cat? Or will she get less nourishment?
    -If it isn’t nutritionally good for the healthy cat to eat that diet, then can you give me any tips on how to start scheduling their feeding time rather than leaving the dry food out all the time so that they each get the food they need?

    • ANSWER:
      I’ll tell you my opinions and my experiece with feeding CRF cats.

      First, let’s say that cats bodies crave protein. To feed them a low protein diet is very unnatural, and many refuse to eat it. The conventional thinking is that by limiting protein you limit the strain on the kidneys in processing it. But if a cat won’t eat, then what?

      The low protein diets are NOT healthy or suitable for feeding your other cat. Few prescription diets are suitable for feeding a healthy cat, and I think the low protein diets are the worst for a healthy cat. I would NOT feed Hills in any case, they really have low quality ingredients and most are just full of by-products. If you must feed a prescription diet, look into the Royal Canin ones. They have a renal diet as well, and you have two choices in the canned food. Better quality ingredients than Hills, but not all vets carry it.

      There are two schools of though when it comes to kidney diets. One is the low protein, the other is the high quality protein, low phosphorus school. That’s the one I’ve chosen to follow. The vets who support that way of thinking say that it’s appropriate for cats in kidney failure, except the end stage of the disease. The other thing you can do is feed an all-canned diet – the moisture is good for the kidneys and other organs. What little dry you feed should have a phosphorus content of 1% or less.

      At first my vet was opposed to the diet I was feeding my kidney-compromised cat, but we’re maintaining him very well on it and it’s now been 6 years since his initial diagnosis. His weight is good, his kidney numbers have dropped to just one tick above normal, and he eats readily. His diet is mostly canned – Wellness, Merrick, Weruva – all high-quality protein, no fillers, no junk. The small amounts of dry they are fed include Wellness, California Natural, and EVO. I’d feed all EVO but it’s phosphorus content is too high.

      At this point, what I would do is limit the dry food, and switch it to one that’s got no by-products (that’s junk – a very low quality protein source and it has to be hard on the kidneys to process that). Two foods that have high-quality protein and an acceptable phosphorus content are Wellness and California Natural. Any canned is good, even the Authority you are feeding. Increase the canned, and encourage water drinking. Many cats enjoy a fountain, and that does increas their water consumption.

      Yahoo has a group for CRF cats – I’d encourage you to join that as you’ll get many real life success stories for managing CRF cats. There really is more to treating a CRF cat than plunking down a bowl of Hill’s K/D.

  9. QUESTION:
    feline kidney failure?
    Please, any advice helpful!!! My cat is 9 years old and in april 08 had high BUN and creatnine levels (69 bun, 3.8 creatnine) after treatment and switching to kd diet, she lowered in a week to (38 and 2.3) Now in July 08 she is weak and lethargic, not moving hardly at all, so I took her to the vet today (different vet) and they tell me her levels are at 232 bun and 13.6 creatnine! is that possible? has anyone heard of a cat with levels that high? Any info is appreciated, I left her overnight she’s getting iv fluids and monitored every few hours, etc. I’m just not sure why such a huge jump in numbers. She’s very dehydtrated (i have 2 cats so didn’t notice her lack of water drinking right away) I love her very much and want to do everything I can to save her as long as it doesn’t mean prolonging her pain. i would appreciate any info/advice, thank you so much for reading.

    • ANSWER:
      HI there… dehydration can cause the BUN to be excessively elevated as well as Creatinine.

      Cats who have been diagnosed with Chronic renal Failure (CRF) will become extremely lethargic, weak and have poor appetite.

      The kidneys are complicated organs that have numerous biological roles. Some examples of the functions they perform are to regulate blood pressure by a hormone known as erythropoietin that helps produce red blood cells (erythropoiesis), filter toxins, etc. Whenever the kidneys are unable to produce enough of the hormone erythropoietin it will make a cat feel tired and weak as well as nauseated.

      The following easy to understand website is thoroughly as well as extremely informative on how to manage CRF in cats: http://felinecrf.com/what0.htm

      This website outlines all the aspects on CRF… how to manage it through diet, home care, medications as well as provide emotional support by knowing what to expect through each stage.

  10. QUESTION:
    Treating kidney stones in cats: Medicated food?
    Hello-
    My cat Tut has recently be diagnosed with kidney stones. The vet prescribed us some special dissolutionary cat food (Royal Canin Urinary SO canned cat food) to help manage/dissolve the stones… The only problem is he refuses to eat it! He will go on a hunger strike and lose weight if it’s all I feed him. His old diet will only worsen the stones, so now I’m stuck.

    My question is: does anyone know of a different kind/brand of cat food that works for dissolving kidney stones? I ordered some royal canin dry food to try soon. NOTE: they are NOT bladder stones.

    Or has anyone had experience with herbal remedies for feline kidney stones? I’m just looking for any options at this point. Thank you in advance.

    P.S. I’ve tried to make the current medicated food enticing by heating it up, mashing it, mixing it with water, all to no avail.

    • ANSWER:
      You are seeing one of the most difficult and frustrating things when your cat needs to be on a specific diet. The Royal Canin works for both struvite and oxalate crystals that can form. If only struvite treatment becomes much easier, since acidification works. But oxalate crystals are not soluble in water, nor can they be made soluble, so dietary approaches are required. And many cats form both types of crystals.

      You can ask your vet about Hills feline c/d or Purina UR St/Ox. And there may be others specially formulated. Encouraging your cat to drink more is also useful, and often a fountain will do that.

      For kidney stones versus bladder stones, see the link for more amplification of types of stones.

  11. QUESTION:
    I need help understanding/interpreting feline blood test results. No guessing please.?
    I took my 13 yr old cat to the vet last week because she is having labored breathing. She seems fine, not distressed, eating fine but her breathing sounds bad and her sides retract each time she breathes. She was breathing very quick shallow breaths. The vet said it was asthma but wanted to do xrays and blood tests to be sure. Her blood test results were as follows:

    Test Result Reference Range Indicator
    ALB = 3.1 g/dL 2.3-3.9 Normal
    ALKP = 36 U/L 14-111 Normal
    ALT < 10U/L 12-130 No graph shown
    AMYL = 573 U/L 500-1500 Normal (at the low end of normal)
    BUN = 16 mg/dL 16-36 Low (on the line for low/normal, vet says Low)
    Ca = 9.1 mg/dL 7.8-11.3 Normal
    CHOL = 126 mg/dL 65-225 Normal
    CREA = 2.3 mg/dL 0.8-2.4 High? (inside the "normal" box but towards high end,
    vet says "High")
    GLOB = 3.7 g/dL 2.8-5.1 Normal
    GLU = 155 mg/dL 71-159 High (line between normal/high, vet says not a
    concern, it's just high because she's scared
    or nervous)
    PHOS = 5.1 mg/dL 3.1-7.5 Normal
    TBIL < 0.1 mg/dL 0.0-0.9 No graph shown
    TP = 6.8 g/dL 5.7-8.9 Normal

    HCT = 37.9% 24.0-45.0 Normal
    HGB = 11.5 g/dL 8.0-15.0 Normal
    MCHC = 30.3 g/dL 30.0-36.9 Low (line between low/normal)
    WBC = 25.2 x10^9/L 5.0-18.9 High
    GRANS = 22.0 x10^9/L 2.5-12.5 High
    %GRANS =87%
    L/M =3.2 x10^9/L 1.5-7.8 Normal
    %L/M = 13%
    PLT = 46 x10^9/L 175-500 Low
    Retics ~ 0.6%

    Her vet said she has CRF/kidney disease and told me to start her on Hill's Prescription Diet or if she wouldn't eat that (said a lot of cats won't) a recipe she gave me that consisted of liver, calcium carbonate, eggs and vegetable oil immediately. She said based on her creatinine levels my cat was in the 3rd of 4 stages and her kidneys would fail quickly if I continued with her current diet. She made it clear that I needed to start feeding her the new diet immediately. My cat won't eat it, any of it. She's always been a very picky eater. I went back and asked for a can of the prescription food, the vet tech sold me a can of a/d critical care formula, she ate this. I went back to get more and the vet said it was not good for her kidneys :^/ That she has to eat the k/d formula. I bought this and she won't touch it. I even tried adding tuna juice and she won't touch it.

    While researching what else she can eat, I noticed that her blood test results don't seem to be consistent with CRF test results. ie: her BUN is low/normal not high, HCT is normal, PHOS is normal

    I am wondering if anyone that knows veterinary medicine can answer this for me. I'm extremely concerned because she was eating fine before the diet change even with the labored breathing, now she won't eat any of the k/d foods and not more than a bite or two of anything else. The vet says if she won't eat the kidney diet to add water and force feed it to her from a squeeze bottle. This seems counterproductive (and painful for me, she doesn't like being force-anything) if she isn't in kidney failure. If she is, then I would really appreciate suggestions on alternatives to the aforementioned k/d food (tried can and dry) and the k/d liver recipe that she won't eat.

    She has had antibiotic and steroid shots for the lung infection. Plus the vet prescribed liquid antibiotics and probiotic paste to take home. My cat would let me give her the antibiotics to begin with because she didn't have much "fight" in her. Now she has it back and is fighting me when I give her the antibiotic. She won't touch the probiotic or any food that I put it in, even tuna (the bribe food/her fave). I've also been putting her in a crate and giving her albuterol nebulizer treatments followed by percussions. Her breathing is better than it was. But her respirations while laying down/resting are 55-60 breaths per minute.
    Vet did xrays because she felt "lumps" in her hind legs. Turned out to be nothing. The xrays did show "something" in her lungs (two hazy spots, one at the top edge of right lung and one on the towards the edge of the left lung) but the doctor said with her age she doesn't recommend surgery to find out if it is something "bad" or not. Just do antibiotics/nebs/percussions
    JC: Thank you so much for your reply. I appreciate you taking the time to read my entire question and to give an informed answer. She is family. I've had her since she was a tiny kitten and she means the world to me. My gut told me that something wasn't right with her diagnosis. Especially when she was looking at the xrays. She went up to the light board and stared at it, then moved really close and stared again for a bit and then said "there's something here..and here" pointing at the very light hazy spots but didn't tell me what that meant until I asked for more information. So, no, she did not send them to a radiologist. I had taken her in because of the breathing and she also had a hard spot under one of her nipples. We got a dog last year, so for the past year she doesn't live in my lap like she always has. Needless to say, when I was holding her, I felt the "tough" spot on her tummy/under the nipple. The vet seemed somewhat unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that
    unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that it was a "mammary tumor" which seems like something to be concerned about. She said if it gets any bigger to bring her back, but that was that. Velvet has always been a very healthy fiesty girl (she's a Russian Blue) but in the last couple of years she developed a small lump over her front right shoulder, it looks/feels like fluid filled skin, I was told by everyone this is nothing to be concerned about especially since it doesn't hurt her in the least to touch it, press it, etc. The vet said it wasn't anything to worry about either, just due to her getting older. She did say that because of the lumps in her legs and the hard spot in her tummy we should do xrays to make sure it wasn't a tumor in her lungs causing the breathing problems. I asked about the legs, because she didn't even mention them when reviewing the xray. She said "it's nothing, if it was, I would have told you".

    I was terrified when I went in. She seems to have

    • ANSWER:
      Time to find a new vet.

      Those aren’t the kidney numbers of a CRF cat. A better predictor of kidney health is to test the specific gravity of the urine – if it’s concentrated, the kidneys are functioning properly, if it’s too dilute, they are starting to age. The reduced kidney function is one of aging, and not a disease. A cat’s body craves and needs protein – that is why she is instinctively rejecting the K/D. Very few vets will prescribe a low-protein diet for cats with aging kidneys – they 1) won’t eat it 2) it leads to muscle wasting (the body needs to get protein from somewhere!) and 3) it hasn’t been proven that low-protein slows down the progression of the CRF. What she needs is to eat – a high quality canned food free of by-products and chemical preservatives. That’s what my vet recommends, based on the latest research. The by-products are hard to digest, and the chemicals are tough on the kidneys. Good canned foods will keep her better hydrated, and slow down the aging of the kidneys.

      Did the vet send the xrays out for a ‘real’ radiologist to interpret? Cats with asthma – untreated – can get hard spots in their lungs, and those will show up on xrays. It takes a real radiologist to interpret an xray – the answer is NOT surgery to find out what it is, it’s to have a qualified person read and interpret the xray. Personal story – my rescue rex was coughing prior to his coming to me, and was taken to the vet who did a chest xray, and diagnosed severe hear disease and wanted to do ultrasounds, etc. I insisted that the xrays were to be sent to a radiologist – diagnosis was asthma. Quite a bit different than the vet’s diagnosis of an aorta ready to self destruct.

      CRF is not a death sentence. And yours isn’t there yet. Feeding her a food she can’t stand is counterproductive, and can lead to liver failure when she refuses to eat. Find another vet, and feed her a quality canned food so that the poor thing eats! At 13 – with that pretty good bloodwork – she should have some good quality years left to spend with you.

  12. QUESTION:
    Kidney Failure in Cats?
    I just read an update on a cat I used to sponsor at a shelter. It said she has been diagnosed with kidney failure, has undergone blood testing, placed on fluids and a special diet…etc. Is kidney failure always fatal? If yes, how long can a feline survive upon diagnosis? This is just such a sad story. This beautiful Himalayan dumped in a parking lot of a shelter, found to have tumors. They have been caring for her in foster care for years and now this kidney failure diagnosis. This really saddens me.

    • ANSWER:
      Kidney failure is a frequent cause of death in cats if they do not succumb to other things first. Many cats have decreased kidney function as they reach the high teens and it does not cause death immediately.

      My cat lived to be 22+. Her kidney function slipped downhill for at least four years before she finally died from it and she did not “suffer” from it till the very end. Tumors are an entirely different type of diagnosis. Most tumors in elderly cats are cancerous.

  13. QUESTION:
    Preventing kidney failure in felines?
    My first cat died of kidney failure at about 13 years of age. Now my other cat, who is about 19, also has failing kidneys. We’ve put her on a special no protein diet as advised by our vet.

    Since kidney failure is so common among felines, is there anything i can do to try to prevent it from happening to my 4 year old cat? He’s overweight which isn’t a good sign already. I’d like to do some research on this topic so does anyone have sites to get me started?

    Thanks so much in advance

    • ANSWER:
      The NEW research (not all vets keep up with this) says high protein is better, but you have to make sure the cat gets more fluids, to keep the kidney function going. Originally the thought was that cats were like humans (who need low protein to combat this) but new research says otherwise.

      Go to google.com and type in CRF feline, this will get you the main basic sites with the up to date info on what the problem is (kidney failure) and how to best stall it off and keep the cat maintained.

      Mine has been CRF for 4 years and is stable. The low protein food made him worse. The higher protein food, mostly canned, is working really well with him. He drinks enough to pee three times a day, I have multiple water bowls and mugs around the house to encourage it, plus he gets water added to his canned food to make a slurry, and a small amount of milk (he doesn’t get stomach upset on that) for fluids. I check his shoulder skin too, to make sure it tents then goes down properly, to check his hydration. If it’s showing a problem I syringe water into him. We haven’t had to worry about giving fluids intraveneously yet.

      There’s also some good cat groups for this over on YahooGroups, try Handicats, or search on the words kidney issues cat, feline CRF or something similar. You can talk to owners who all have cats with this condition.

  14. QUESTION:
    BARF diet for Cats…anyone?
    I have a male adult cat who has been troubled by a horrible illness called Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) I was told by the vet he’d end up with cancer in the colon. Yes, he had chronic colitis, a problem in the large intestine which was causing my pet bleed through the rectum and horrible, nonstop diarrhea. My kitty was getting weary of his suffering and I was getting so, so tired of throwing away bed sheets, cleaning after him every day sometimes 2 times a day. I could not sleep well just thinking of what else I could have possibly found dirty in the house. He never went outside the box, but all that blood, with colon mucose coming out he could not control. My cat got to a point where he could not sit down comfortably, and there was bloody diarrhea in his tail, kitchen counter, tables, furniture etc ALL THE TIME.

    I did not want to watch my cat give up and not do anything, so I did some research and finally switched him to a species appropriate diet: cooked or raw meat with bones, organs and probiotics and digestive enzymes. I now am keeping all my cats on the BARF diet, always making sure I get fresh food from animals which were not cured or injected with substances to keep the meat fresh. I also make sure to keep the phosphorus-calcium ratio right, and it’s been a year now since I have not seen signs of IBD. My cat’s stools are formed and healthy. My vet says my cat looks incredibly fine.

    So, I just wanted to see how many follow this diet and what you think of it. I am aware of the risks, like toxoplasmosis, but my cat was dying in front of my eyes on Science Diet, Purina, Iams, Prescription foods like Hill’s z/d etc, and many, many more expensive commercial foods and not one helped my poor feline. He was on antibiotics and prednisone all the time and nothing ever worked! So, I learned that cats are obligate carnivores and need to eat other animals to live a better life. I have noticed too many cases of IBD, Diabetes, Obesity, UTI, Kidney Disease, and cancer, all because we’re feeding species inappropriate foods to our precious pets. The number of sick ones keeps increasing, and we are responsible.

    Anyone trying out this diet? I’d love to hear some of your experiences.
    If anyone is interested, this website I’m about to provide is one of the best and I am a client of them. I encourage everybody to take a look. Their service is high quality. Thank you ladies!

    www.hare-today.com

    • ANSWER:
      When I first was investigating the raw diets I was on groups where people reported that many cats would be “cured” of IBD within 48 hours. I have had no experience of that with my cats so I’m happy to hear another testimonial to the efficacy of a raw meat diet for cat health.

      I too only do a 50% raw diet. Right now I am down to my last frozen “muffin” of raw chicken. No hearts at the store today. When I called the market where I get my turkey parts last week they had just cleaned out the turkeys and thrown away the hearts and livers to use with the turkey.

      Also, having acquired two kittens this summer I am going through the raw meat mixture at double the speed I am used to.

      I do think the diet has extraordinary benefits for cat health.

  15. QUESTION:
    Anyone have a cat with Feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC)?
    My cat was diagnosed with FIC. She is 4 years old.

    She has never had crystals in her urine. For about 7 months she was being treated for UTI on and off, because on occasion bacteria was in the urine.

    She has recently had another urine analysis and it has shown blood in the urine, no bacteria, normal PH level, normal levels of sugar, no crystals, normal white blood cell count, normal kidney function as well.
    We have had an X-Ray done, where it shows her bladder wall is thick and recently had an ultra sound done, there are no stones, and everything looks great (kidneys, bladder and spleen), although it confirmed she has an inflamed bladder lining. (this led to the diagnosis of FIC)

    We have made many changes over the last 7 months since she had her first UTI (although her concern is FIC). We have provided a water fountain, another litter box, wet/dry food diet, with water added to the wet food, the vet has approved her food, it is Wellness brand. We have provided her with lots of toys and scratching posts.

    Her biggest symptoms has been consistent meowing (cries over everything) and increased urination (never had any accidents though) and increased licking of the stomach and genitals at times. She has been fixed 3 years ago and does not go outdoors (although has access to lots of windows)

    The vet said the best way to try and treat FIC (this will be her first attempt to treat it), would be to hit it from all possible angles. 4 weeks antibiotics, 1 x week for 4 weeks of an injection to repair her bladder wall (I forget the name of this injection), and a round of cortisone to relive the inflammation to encourage healing.

    Has anyone had any experience with FIC?
    I am not looking for website, strictly experience.

    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      I have a cat who struggles with cystitis. It is a bear to get over and keep over. I keep her on a homeopathic remedy to help keep the pH level proper in her urinary tract. It took about 12 weeks of antibiotics and steroids along with this remedy to get her back in sync. I continue to give her the uti remedy everyday as I don’t need another round of FIC. I wrote an article on the topic below. I also sell the remedy. Best, Kater

  16. QUESTION:
    How to feed a kitten a raw diet?
    My 6 month old kitten has allergies. She did have really bad infected skin and diarrhea, etc. She also has feline herpes virus but she has medicine to help that. But the food allergies certainly did not help it any. I switched her to food to the blue buffalo chicken rice kitten food. That cleared her skin up and she seems to be doing fine with it…but I’ve read that dry food can lead to kidney problems or something. I’ve also read that even canned food is not near as healthy as raw food. So I would like to feed her something as close to what she would eat in the wild as I possibly can. That seems to be healthiest way to go. But I don’t know where to start. So to the people who raw feed I need as much info on it as possible. If you could tell me what to feed, how much to feed, anything like that I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have prepared a raw food diet for my cats for eight years now. I use a supplement powder (http://felineinstincts.com

      You can go there to learn something about it. You can also join the Yahoo group WholeCatHealth. The members there feed raw or are making the transition to raw.

      I use a combination of raw and canned. My two kittens, who are now 7 months old, have eaten the raw since I got them at three months.

      You might start with quality canned food. Wellness has turkey, chicken, beef and chicken which substantially have no ingredients other than the meat.

  17. QUESTION:
    FLUTD cat food recommendations / options? any VETS? people with long time experience? (long question)?
    one of my cats has FLUTD. my vet told me (and has repeatedly told me) that the only food they recommend feeding him at all is Hills PRESCRIPTION (not science) Diet Feline c/d dry food, which can only be purchased at a veterinary clinic, because it lowers the pH of his urine because of its low magnesium.

    I’ve read elsewhere and have been told by other people (not veterinarians though) many different things including:

    1. that dry food contributes to the problem by removing hydration from the cats sytem?
    2. that Hills Prescription Diet contains mostly grains?
    3. that removing magnesium from foods is not the best solution, as cats may need some magnesium?

    my concern is that if any of the things people are telling me are correct, and I’m buying food vets get paid to sell, I could be shortening his lifespan when my intention is to keep him alive and happy as long as possible.

    he’s eaten Prescription c/d for at least 4 years and has had no health problems while on it, after almost dying from crystal blockage and barely avoiding kidney damage from eating Purina Cat Chow (not saying Purina is dangerous, my cat has a disease). I got him to resume drinking water by buying a cat fountain because he was afraid to drink, and it took a week to get him to eat the Prescription c/d for the first time. but 4 years now.

    a pet shop owner gave me samples of a few different products (but she also told me to continue buying Hills Prescription Feline c/d as she thinks it helps), some of the products being: dry Taste Of The Wild feline formula, dry Felidae, wet Wellness Healthy Indulgence packets (she had no dry Wellness). she also told me what others have: that moisure/water is the best because it can prevent the crystals from forming and the infections from coming back. she said cats are desert animals and naturally resist water, so wet food is best.

    so far my plan is: continue feeding Hills Prescription c/d, buy Wellness wet Healthy Indulgence packets to give him more liquids.

    anyone have any experience with this situation? what do you feed your cat, and how long has it worked?

    • ANSWER:
      My cat, Kiwi, developed stress-related FLUTD. He is a typical case- 3 year old adult male indoor cat, overweight about 10%.
      Vet recommended feeding any of the following: Royal Canin S/O kibbles and pouches (mine loves both), Hill’s C/D (kitty likes it, but not as much as RC), and Purina D/M cans (kitty likes these a little more than Hills).
      If you can afford feeding canned exclusively- go for it.
      If not, the only kibble I feed Kiwi now is the Royal Canin S/O; it’s formulated so neither oxalate nor struvite crystals will form. He loves it, though, so his weight-loss diet isn’t working so well…
      As for my other kitties, I feed grain free, or, rice as the only cereal grain. Wellness, California Naturals, Royal Canin Rabbit and Green Pea, Veterinarian Formulation Chicken and Rice (from Arkat in Arkansas) etc. are all favorites. I give them a variety, so any little flaw in one formulation doesn’t have the chance to cause long-term health issues. My cats range from 2 to 15 years old, and all are doing great.

  18. QUESTION:
    My cat’s very sick, not eating, sleeping a lot…any suggestions?
    He is 17 years old and stopped eating on his own about 3 weeks ago, dropping a lot of weight. He was eating BARF patties when he lost his appetite. He was also very constipated until I changes his diet to fresh raw red meat and he’ll eat this when I hand feed him. He is no longer constipated and is taking about 70 grams a day.

    The vet found he was anemic and had very low blood pressure. He doesn’t have feline leukemia, feline AIDS or kidney problems.

    Thorough blood tests revealed he was bleeding internally. Full body X-rays did not show any obvious bleeds or tumors but did show a thickening of the small intestine.

    Fecal tests were normal.

    He is now on anabolic steroids to pep him up and give him an appetite. His appetite is stronger but he’ll only eat when i hand feed him.

    We are treating his symptoms but I’m still wondering if there is anything else we can do.

    • ANSWER:
      It’s great that he doesn’t have kidney problems. It sounds like you’re doing everything you can for him under a vet’s supervision. There’s a drug for anemia called erythropoietin but I think it’s used for cats that also have chronic renal failure. It may not interact well with steriods. Don’t listen to the other posters that say your cat is just old. My cat died of kidney failure at almost 17 years and I mistakenly assumed that some of his symptoms were related to old age which was not true. By the time I took him to the vet he had so many complications that it was tough for the vet to treat all the issues at the same time. You’re taking great care of your cat. I hope he lives a long life.

  19. QUESTION:
    Interpret Cat Bloodwork?
    Hi there,
    I was wondering if someone could please tell me a little bit more about my cat’s blood test results as I’m quite worried!
    He is nearly 18 and weighs just over 10 pounds. He is pretty healthy (you wouldn’t think he was 17!) and has just started drinking a bit more water hence we got the tests. I wasn’t at the vet but from what I was told they said it could indicate the beginning of kidney trouble – I am quite concerned and wanting some advice.
    His diet consists of human grade steak and cat sachets as well as fresh fish and some cat biscuits.

    I was wondering if the elevated BUN level could have been caused by the the large amount of red meat in his diet and would therefore be remedied by a change in his diet?

    The vet gave him Royal Canin Renal Feline sachets to try.

    Any other information or guidance anyone could give would be greatly appreciated.

    His bloodwork was:
    ALB: 36 (25-38) G/L
    ALP: 18 (10-90) U/L
    ALT: 151* (20-100) U/L
    AMY: 901 (300-1100) U/L
    TBIL: 5 (2-10) UMOL/L
    BUN: 12.8* (3.6-10.7) MMOL/L
    CA: 2.71* (1.60-2.50) MMOL/L
    PHOS: 1.01* (1.3-2.8) MMOL/L
    CRE: 169 (88-177) UMOL/L
    GLU: 6.1 (3.9-8.3) MMOL/L
    NA+ 145* (147-156) MMOL/L
    K+ 4.1 (4.1-4.5)MMOL/L
    TP: 46 (54-78) G/L
    T4: 37 (20-40) NMOL/L
    Chol: 3.3 (2.3-5.3)

    Thanks once again!
    Thanks for your answers – I had a wee look at that site, but am still at a loss to how serious he is in comparison? I have read a few things that say kidney damage can be reversed. I also wondered if anyone could comment on what brands of specialized cat food for kidney problems are good. Just want to do everything I can to help my poor baby!
    Also, in regards to the red meat part – my logic was that it is high in protein and therefore may be causing the difficulty with processing through the kidneys.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, kidney damage is not reversible, contrary to what you may have read online. You can slow down the progress of the disease, though, by switching him to an appropriate, low protein diet such as the Royal Canin food your vet gave you. Other renal diets include Renal LP by Medi-Cal, Medi-Cal Reduced Protein, Hills k/d, and Purina Veterinary Diet NF. To keep the disease progression to a minimum, you’ll need to stop giving all other foods, including steak.

      Kidney disease can be managed and many cats live with it for years. As for what stage kidney failure your boy is in, that’s a question best asked your veterinarian. Keep in mind, you can ALWAYS call and ask questions- if the staff on the desk can’t answer themselves, they’ll either have the vet call you back personally, or ask and call you back themselves.

  20. QUESTION:
    FLUTD – My cat’s urinating blood?
    I have two cats; calico females age 8, sisters from the same litter. Strictly dry food diet, one litter box – automated scooping with crystals.

    Three weeks ago I noticed odd behavior from my kitty, Snickers. She was going into the litter box more frequently with little to no urine. She didn’t seem to be in any pain or discomfort and her attitude was the same. After doing some online research and speaking with a breeder friend of mine, I started homeopathic treatment. Bought new organic high-quality dry and canned food, meat and rice based, instead of meat-meal and corn based. I also bought cranberry capsules from the health food store and made parsley infused water (boiled 1 qt water with 1 bunch parsley, strained and cooled).

    I started integrating the new dry food over the next week and immediately started feeding her canned food twice daily making it into a soup with lots of extra water and the cranberry capsules. I also force feed her the parsley infused water with a dropper 2-3 times a day. I did this for ten days and started to notice an improvement. Urinating more and less frequently.

    After the ten days of treatment, I stopped feeding her canned food and put her back on dry food only, but the new dry food. Five days after the end of treatment, her symptoms returned. So I started her back on canned food with cranberry capsules and took her to the vet on Monday to have a urinalysis completed to make sure there’s no infection or blockage. They put her on IV fluids and kept her for the day. When she came home that night, she started urinating blood and has ever since.

    The test results came back yesterday… no infection or bacteria, no crystals or blockage, but lots of blood. The doctor says it’s FLUTD Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease and it should resolve itself within 7-10 days. It’s typically caused by stress and can be treated with pain reliever until the bleeding stops. If it does not resolve itself, their next suggestion would be an x-ray to determine in there’s any stones in her bladder/kidney, which they say is not too common. They say keep the litter box clean, her environment comfortable, and monitor her urine.

    I read online that changing the diet can be beneficial as well. Most places say no dry food at all, only wet food twice a day. Encourage water intake. Reduce stress. And try antioxidant vitamins and herbs.

    I’m very concerned for her health and safety and I hate that she can’t tell me how she feels. The doctor didn’t seem to think it’s a big deal and really only recommended a pain reliever. But she doesn’t act like she’s in pain, so will it help anything?

    We’re leaving for vacation this Saturday for 7 days. My neighbor and mom will be there to check on her, but I feel horrible leaving not knowing if she’s okay and if I’m doing everything I can to help her. PLEASE any suggestions or advice would be so greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.

    • ANSWER:
      The best cure for FLUTD is water. Cats developed as as desert species, so they are designed to derive most of their liquid intake through the bodies of prey animals. This means that their thirst instinct is not well developed, so even if they do have a good source of nice fresh water, they still may not drink enough to keep them well hydrated. Dry food, as you may now understand, is deficient in one nutrient, and that one nutrient is water. To help your kitty get over her FLUTD, feeding her canned food is a good start. I know that when my boy cat had FLUTD, even buying the prescription formula foods did not do the trick 100%. What really did help, though, was feeding him high quality canned food, and mixing in some extra water into the food.

      Here is a well-researched article on the topic, be sure to scroll down, because it was posted in a threaded forum, and is longer than a single post. And some of the comments on it got interspersed with the main article. http://catfood.tribe.net/thread/8db33940-373d-4063-88e6-e57c0e1e5f29

  21. QUESTION:
    CAT HEALTH Help. High Levels of Microalbuminuria. UTI Symptoms?
    I am in desperate need of some help, I am searching for people who are very knowledgeable in Feline health and will be able to provide me with some sense of what may be a sign to look out for; how to help bring my Kitty to good health. I would appreciate it so much ~ as my little kitty is very dear to me.

    PURPLE IS 2 YEARS OLD.

    I recently noticed frequent use of the litter box and took my cat, Purple, into the vet. I assumed she had a UTI. They did a Urinalisis and Blood test.

    The Red Flags to pay close attention to were;

    - High levels of Albumin ( 4.2 to be exact Refrence Range is ; 2.5 – 3.9)
    - Moderately high levels of Creatine (1.6)
    - Low levels of Platelet Count ( 144 Reference Range is 200 – 500 )
    -High Occult blood
    -High levels of protein
    -High RBC.
    They indicate that there is a high level of Microalbuminuria. It is 8.5 and Reference Range is <2.5

    So aside from that, the Receptionist at the Vet told me “Her Kidneys are functioning correctly but since there are these Red Flags there is the ability for infection/clogging.” I have had Purple on K/D food to help with her kidney and to lower her protein intake for about 5 days. She is on CLAVAMOX (antibiotic) and we keep her hydrated. She does not drink water (due to the fact we have kept her hydrated I feel), and she eats regularly. She has been showing more use of the litter box and I have witnessed her poop twice (very dark brown). She is spunky and talkative, and when she is resting she cleans herself but still licks down there mildly cause of irritation I am assuming.

    My questions are;
    -Are there any other types of Antibiotics/ Medicine I should ask a Vet about?
    -What Foods would help with Purples diet? I would like to maintain low levels of protein and creatine.
    -What health signs could these be? ( I know it depends on so much but a broad idea )

    Because of the fact I did not get anything explained to me by the Vet I took Purple to, I am planning on taking her to a different; better rated one for her next Bloodtest (after she finishes her dose of Clavamox). I will be keeping a update on her health.

    Thank you so very much for taking the time, and bless your heart if you can help ~

    • ANSWER:
      First, contact your vet and talk to him/her specificallly about what the lab results were and what it means for your cat. It sounds like there is some damage or decreased function of the kidneys based upon your lab results, but your VET is the one that you should talk to about these–not the receptionist or someone on the computer.

      Keep her on the K/D. It is a prescription diet designed specifically for kidney disease issues. Don’t go adding foods or mixing and matching foods because that is an easy way to mess up the nutrient balance of the diet.

      I would not immediately go to a second vet, just make sure that you get the information on your cat from your VET in the future.It may have been a random situation where the vet was dealing with an emergency or in surgery when you picked up your cat. However if having the receptionist discharge medical patients (as opposed to bath/dips, boarding) is a regular situation, then that would be a reason for switching vets. Client education is a very important part of providing medical care for a patient and with a medical case you should always get to talk to a vet for the initial diagnosis and at least a credentialed veterinary technician for rechecks of lab results.

  22. QUESTION:
    Suggestions for a geriatric cat with notable difficulty in chewing, drinking? Any veterinarians out there?
    She is a 19-year old spayed female American shorthair, still remarkably active, even though last year’s metabolic panel suggested that she is experiencing some renal distress. I’ve tried to modify her diet accordingly, but she seems to have difficulty masticating, and won’t eat kibble at all. She has always been very slender, but is now so thin…practically emaciated… that I feed her whatever she is willing to eat, just to get the calories into her. Her appetite has not been an issue; I believe that the weight loss has been largely due to some metabolic or other systemic problem, but for the record, her bloodwork has not indicated any thyroid dysfunction, nor is she diabetic. She is pretty elderly, as cats go, of course, and over the last year or two, there have been episodes where I thought that she was succumbing to the inevitable kidney failure (dark then bloody urine, lethargy, malaise) but each time she has rebounded, and even now, as thin as she is (probably under 3 pounds), she remains vigorous and playful, her eyes are bright and clear, and she is clearly not in other distress. BUT: She seems to have difficulty drinking, preferring to lap water from the dripping faucet in the kitchen, which is fine by me, but even then, she frequently “pops” her mouth open, distends her tongue, cocking her head this way and that…and just appears as if she is somehow confused about how to proceed. When eating (canned pate’ type food), she pauses occasionally, performing the same actions, but in this case, the popping noise seems to be accompanied by a “grinding” component as well…it is difficult to distinguish, but darned if it doesn’t sound like cases of TMJ that I’ve heard before (in humans). It might be coming from the mandib. joint, but it could also be a grinding tooth, or teeth, or both, just something else- I just can’t say. I have felt/palpated her jaw, throat and neck pretty thoroughly, and I cannot find any irregularity, much less a mass or obstruction, and she doesn’t evidence any discomfort or tenderness when I do this, even when I apply pressure to the joint and the adjacent masseter muscle. As far as I can tell, her teeth remain (astoundingly) intact…indeed, she was able to give me quite a fierce little bite when I poked at her gums, though it was agitation, I think, not a response to a specific pain. Her gums appear pink and, I guess, normal…I just don’t see anything out of order, but then, I’m not a medical professional. There is this: Her breath seems unusually nasty (even for a cat). I haven’t anyone to assist me with her, so I cannot examine her really thoroughly, once she gets irritated and begins struggling.

    It seems that she ends up leaving as much as 1/2 of her food uneaten- although it is scattered in remnant bits on and around her dish, as if she tried, but couldn’t swallow it properly. I’m also quite concerned about dehydration. Maybe a year or so ago, when this behavior was apparent but still much less conspicuous than now, my veterinarian checked her mouth, gums, throat, etc., and found nothing at that time.

    Of course I intend to take her in for another exam, but those trips are REALLY traumatic for this particular cat, and, while I’m embarassed to admit this, I’m presently out of a job and just flat busted…as in eating Ramen noodles and drinking Sam”s Choice sody pop-broke..the cats eat better than me. I guess I was hoping that someone out there might perhaps recognize these symptoms from an experience of their own, or better yet, if some cat-savvy vet might be willing to suggest some additional diagnostic steps that I ought to take…any other things I should check or pay particular attention to? I wonder about the possibility of some sort of periodontal or possibly sinus infection, and even pondered giving her a course of (feline) Amoxicillin to see if there is any improvement. Anyway, if you’ve read this far, thank you for your perseverance.

    Oh, and while I guess that, strictly speaking, I am maybe one of those persons guilty of asking for free medical advice, I COMPLETELY understand and acknowledge that any veterinary professional kind enough to respond to my query CANNOT be expected diagnose or treat over the Internet, and while I am deeply greatful for any consideration, I do not expect a diagnosis, and of course any respondent is completely free from liability…held harmless…all those exceptions and caveats and whatnot that a physician’s lawyers probably like to hear.

    • ANSWER:
      You’re right it is impossible to diagnose your cat long distance, in spite of the detailed description you give, however, this sounds like it could be a dental problem. Without knowing details regarding the physical exam, and how thorough it was, its hard to know for sure. The results of any blood work,as well as how long ago it was performed, would also be helpful. There may be little to do regardless due to your pet’s very advanced age.

  23. QUESTION:
    How my Vet handled all my alternative practices this wkd at our annual?
    1. We discussed raw diet a little bit w/my vet and again, she offered no opinion, didn’t recommend against, she just listened and acknowledged and gave no editorial comment.

    2. We discussed vaccinations. We declined bordatella, she didn’t argue against. Got the 1 yr rabies booster.

    3. We got them a heartworm test. I said I discontinue Revolution during the winter months b/c there are no mosquitos. She agreed but IHO its only safe for 2 months out of the year here (midwest)

    4. We declined rabies for our cats b/c they are old, indoors and their kidneys are shot – and our vet agreed, but she talked us into feline distemper, saying it was safe and indoor cats can catch it from stuff we & the dogs track in. Also, they both showed a 10% weight loss after holding steady for a long time. This may be the begin of the end :(

    What do YOU do that differs from the mainstream program, and what has YOUR vet had to say about it?
    MM – I don’t do Bordatella b/c my dogs are never kennelled, never go to dog parks and have zero off leash exposure to any dogs besides their two next door neighbors.
    I generally don’t vaccinate unless the risk (probability and potential severity) of contracting a disease outweighs the dangers posed by the vaccine itself.

    • ANSWER:
      I only get shots one time after I get a dog, that is it. Of course some of the vets I go to do not agree with that theory, its money not in their pocket for them.
      The dog only goes to the vet if there are parts hanging outside that clearly belong inside him, vet does not like that either.
      Vet does not like prescribing emergency meds to counter the effects of accidental drug ingestion while at work, but, he did it anyway when he realized that if it happens, my dog can die getting to the vet. In general, we don’t see eye to eye on most things, but, we have an understanding.
      Hope I helped.

  24. QUESTION:
    Cat pees everywhere…?
    Nika is a female 2 yrs old and has been peeing in my lap for some time… That has quit an so did her peeing on anything else, it just recently started again. She was diagnosed with anemia not but a month ago, and taking meds regularly. She DOES NOT have a UTI, vet ran tests and kidneys, liver, EVERYTHING is fine just low iron. And I have her on a special diet that fights UTI. But she has not been in heat for a year that I’ve noticed, she’s never been the type to cry and howl to let me know, just rubs on he carpet, she’s very toned down. Could this be her in heat, but her ahem vagina is not swolen, so I didn’t think she was in heat, is she just marking her territory? Also I switched to feline pine litter bc she was eating the clay and paper type trying to gain nutrients, and I spend 20 mins twice a day to sift and separate the pellets from the sawdust… And clean it with soap and hot water once to twice a week… So it’s not bc it’s not clean, shell run away from the box to pee and I have tried moving it to where she has accidents… It only works for a day then wees on a blanket… I’m having to keep er locked in the bathroom and she needs to be around people this is killing me, anyone know what I can do?
    She did start doing this when I had to give my other cat away, a friend was really attached to her and was moving so I let him have her… And se did have an accident before but I think it was bc the other one was in heat… Thts the only time shed stop using it… It stopped for about a month and now the past 2 weeks she’s been doing it… Only been 4-5 months since this started.. And she does like to pee on the dresser then lay in it… I didn’t think it was bc sheissed the other cat bc they didn’t interact very much… But I can’t read cats minds : /
    Yes I’ve taken her to bandfield animal hospital, hurst animal clinic and an emergency clinic and has been cleared by all 3… That is what confuses me the most… I got a new kitten today to see how’d she react before I adopted and she loves her… She always hisses at other cats and she was completely fine with the new one… Mybe just an emotional problem
    Okay further reding on your answer Anna helped… Thanks I’ll Truro get different tests done, I’ve already have had fecal, blood, cardio, and few other test run by 2 vets I’ll see what else they can do
    Wow obviously syd can’t read…. It’s a female… Not a male… Yes she could be marking but I’ll go with Anna in this one… I’m thinking bone marrow is the way to go

    • ANSWER:
      If all vet tests come back clear, I would recommend seeing a pet behaviorist. Cats react badly to change and maybe losing her cat friend caused her a lot of stress, even if they didn’t seem close.

      I have to comment on her ‘special diet’ though. There is NO special diet that prevents UTI. The research is done and paid for by the very same companies who manufacture the food and no independent lab has ever confirmed the results!

      The only appropriate diet for a cat is one closest to what she would eat in nature. Raw is best, but if you can’t make it with all the supplements, canned would do just fine. You need to look for grain-free brands with muscle meat as first ingredient and no by-product. Some good brands are Wellness, EVO, Merrick and Nature’s Variety. The canned food will also provide your cat with enough moisture to wash out the kidneys and bladder and actually does a lot more for the urinary tract than the dry kibble.

      Cats are designed to get their moisture from food and even when water is provided, the cats on dry have less than half of the hydration they need.

      Dry food and even prescription dry are made of cheap ingredients like corn, soy, wheat that have no place in cat’s diet. it’s an obligate carnivore and needs meat to survive. These grains are also high in carbs and dry is considered #1 cause of feline diabetes and obesity and associated with urinary tract disease, kidney disease, crystals, renal failure and more. Vets have close to no education on nutrition and are trained by the food manufacturers in school, so they know no better.

      Try reading these articles to understand what your cat needs to be healthy and happy and maybe the happier cat will be able to better cope in your household.

      Good luck!!


Feline End Stage Kidney Disease

India have a lot of hospitals offering world class treatments for kidney stone at very affordable price, Indian hospitals has brought the best and multifarious individual kidney surgeons from all parts of the world under one entity. The reason India is a favorable destination is because of its infrastructure and technology in which it is at par with those in USA, UK and Europe. There are several kidney care packages available for kidney stone surgery in India, depending upon the requirements of the person. Cost comparison for some of the kidney treatment procedures between USA and India may be worth noting. Many of the procedures find a huge difference between the pricing (about 7/8 times when we speak of Top-end surgeons). India has some of the best clinics/hospitals and treatment centers in the world with the best facilities for kidney stone surgery. Since India is also one of the most favorable tourist destinations in the world, kidney stone treatment combined with tourism has come into effect, from which the concept of medical tourism in India is derived.
Kidney Stones – Surgery

People rarely need open surgery to treat kidney stones. In most cases, other less invasive treatments are successful. You may need open surgery when the kidney stone is causing severe bleeding that cannot be controlled. In this case, the surgeon makes a cut in your side or stomach to reach the kidneys, and he or she removes the stone.

Another type of surgery, percutaneous nephrolithotomy or nephrolithotripsy, is also used. The surgeon puts a narrow telescope into your kidney through small cuts in your back. He or she then removes (lithotomy) or breaks up and removes (lithotripsy) the stone. This surgery may be used if other procedures do not work or if you have a very large stone. See a picture of nephrolithotomy.

In rare cases, a person forms kidney stones because the parathyroid glands produce too much of a hormone, which leads to higher calcium levels and possibly calcium-type kidney stones. To help prevent stones from coming back, your doctor may suggest surgery to remove a parathyroid gland or glands (parathyroidectomy).

Symptoms

Kidney stones are often painless and without any symptoms. Many of them pass off in the urine. However some stones will not pass out of the system:

  • Extreme pain in your back or side that will not go away.
  • Blood in your urine.
  • Fever and chills.
  • Vomiting.
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy.
  • A burning feeling when you urinate.
  • Increased frequency, urgency or hesitancy when passing urine.

Treatment

The type of stone, in size and content, determines the nature of treatment.

Usually, if the stone is less than 5mm in size, there is a good chance of it passing without any surgical intervention. If it is very painful, painkillers may be prescribed. Depending on the type of stone, medication may also be prescribed.

If the kidney stone is larger than 1/2 inch (or 10mm) in diameter it will likely need to be either removed by surgery (open or endoscopic) or by lithrotripsy.

The countries where medical tourism is being actively promoted include Greece, South Africa, Jordan, India, Malaysia, Philippines and Singapore. Though a recent entrant, India is fast emerging a most competent and cost effective contender in the world medical tourism scenario. According to a study by McKinsey and the Confederation of Indian Industry, medical tourism in India could become a $1 billion business by 2012. The report predicts that: “By 2012, if medical tourism were to reach 25 per cent of revenues of private up-market players, up to 2,297,794,117 USD will be added to the revenues of these players”. The Indian government predicts that India’s $17-billion-a-year health-care industry could grow 13 per cent in each of the next six years, boosted by all aspects of medical tourism, which industry watchers say is growing in the range between 20 to 30 per cent annually. Hospitals of kidney stone surgery in India at Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Hyderabad and Bangalore are aiding nearly 7800 international patients every year. For more details on kidney stone surgery in India visit http://www.forerunnershealthcare.com and enquiry@forerunnershealthcare.com

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:

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  2. QUESTION:

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  3. QUESTION:

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  4. QUESTION:

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  5. QUESTION:

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Feline Kidney Disease

SENIOR-DOG CITIZENS

By Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis

Authors of The Well-Connected Dog: A Guide to Canine Acupressure

Even at 12-years old, Sheba had the look of a regal Irish Setter. Her rich, red, silky coat flowed as she pranced. Still sleek and lean, her white face and telltale shorter gate was evidence that she was a healthy example of a senior-dog citizen. Sheba’s naps were getting longer and when getting up and getting going she needed some coaxing.

The ancient eastern healing art of acupressure offers our senior friends a lot of relief from the aches and pains of aging. It is very common for a dog to suffer the same difficulties we do as the years go on. 1000s of year of acupressure has shown that it:

  • Strengthens the dog’s immune system
  • Lubricates the joints to improve mobility
  • Reduces inflammation associated with arthritis
  • Enhances blood circulation for better overall functioning
  • Releases endorphins and natural cortisone to relieve pain and increase the dog’s comfort level.

A weekly acupressure session with their favorite human goes a long way to having a healthy, happy older dog. Our senior canines want to do all the great things they use to do in their younger days, we just have to help them feel better doing it.

Acupressure Points to Support Senior Canines

Acupressure has proven to help relieve the pain and stiffness of arthritis as well as many other issues associated with aging. Here is a selection of specific acupressure points that can help your dog.

Stomach 36, the translation of its Chinese name is Leg Three Miles, is used extensively to aid digestion and promote gastrointestinal health while also regulating and tonifying blood and life-force energy. This acupoint is known to enhance the animal’s activity level and assist in the absorption of nutrients.

Gall Bladder 34 is also known as Yang Mound Spring. This acupoint has the attribute of influencing the strength and flexibility of tendons, ligaments, and joints. Additionally, it can reduce atrophy of the older dog’s soft tissues.

Kidney 3, traditionally called Great Stream, brings forth the original essence and energy of the animal which supports the dog’s basic constitution. This acupoint is often used to add essential energy during the winter phase of life.

Acupressure Technique

While looking at the chart, place the soft, fleshy part of the tip of your thumb on the point on one side of your dog. Use about 1 pound of pressure, take care not to poke or hurt the dog. Comfortably rest your other hand of the dog, too. Hold your thumb on the point and count to 30 or watch the dog for evidence of releasing of energy. An energetic release would be licking, yawning, stretching, or passing air. Repeat this procedure on the other side of the dog.

By performing the aSenior Caninea acupressure session every five to seven days, you will be contributing to your elder dog’s health and well-being for all his years – which could be many or more.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Our vet told us that diet treatment is the best and only method to treat feline kidney disease. Is this true?
    She just told us to keep feeding our cat Hill’s KD food, and that there was really no other option that would treat the condition just as well. Is this true?

    • ANSWER:
      No it is not and you should go to the group linked below this post. That food is just asking for more trouble.
      Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure

      If your cat is not in final stages, this is not want you want to do. You do not want to put your cat on the
      Vets low protein diet. There are simply so many better options out there than to hand the poor cat a low amount of poor quality protein – which often results in a poor appetite and muscle wasting since the body is now robbing its own muscle mass to feed itself a decent quality and amount of protein.
      . There are new thoughts on this and the thinking is it is not the amount of protein but the quality of protein that matters.
      The Merck veterinary manual [www.merckvetmanual.com] says that cats need “4 g of protein of high biologic value per kg body wt/day”. That’s about 7 calories from protein per pound body weight per day. If a cat isn’t a good eater and consumes, say, 20 calories per pound per day, then 7/20 = 35% of calories can safely be from protein. It must be high quality protein, which means meat, fish, milk, and eggs, and not grain or soy.

      I am under the assumption that you have been feeding mostly dry foods. Many use a vegetable based protein instead of animal and that is part of the problem.. Your cat needs protein as it is a carnivore and cutting down on it will lead to other health issues and may cause faster degeneration.
      You want to cut down on phosphorous (no fish allowed now)

      The best way to do this is with a raw diet which you can make yourself or buy. (Making yourself is better) link provided at the bottom
      If you are unwilling to do that then something like the non fish flavors of Wellness or Merrick with NO grains are good alternatives. Wysong is also a good canned choice. This list gives a breakdown. Remember you want low phosphorous

      http://webpages.charter.net/katkarma/can…

      You should be giviung sub-q fluids as needed

      You also will want to look into phosphorous binders. Something like aluminum hydroxide
      Ask your vet or look into calcitrol

      You may want to talk to the vet about having injectable Pepcid AC on hand or you can buy it in pill form (ac not plain pepcid) and give 1/4 tab for stomach upset which happens a lot in crf cats due to acid in the stomach.
      I hope this stuff helps, here are many links for you
      Making cat food

      http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm

      other links. Read, read, read!!!!

      http://www.felineoutreach.org/EducationD…

      http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_chr…

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

      http://www.felinecrf.com/

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Felin…

      About that vets diet. This report is for dogs but applies to cats

      http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/21…

  2. QUESTION:
    My cat was diagnosed with feline kidney disease, her brown eye is now pink and closed. What can I do?

    • ANSWER:

      http://www.netpets.org/cats/reference/info/catkidney.html

      this is the website i think may be will help you with your problem.
      So try to read it.
      i hope i can help.

  3. QUESTION:
    Feline Kidney Disease-what does it look like in an older cat?
    My 17 year old cat went to the vet because she was dinking a lot of water. The vet did some tests said she had kidney disease ad suggested a change in her diet. I changed to his suggested food and she would not eat it and lost weight. I gave up and went back to the food she likes. Now I notice that her bottom is wet most of the time and she has long hair so this is not pleasant. She still uses the litter box, why is there urine in her fur? What does kidney failure look like?
    How do I know when to let her go to kitty heaven?

    • ANSWER:
      The following websites will help you in your search for education on how to care for your cat with CRF

      http://www.holisticat.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80%3Acrf&catid=76%3Achronic-&Itemid=112&limitstart=2

      http://www.felinecrf.com/

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

  4. QUESTION:
    Feline Kidney Disease/Failure?
    The Vet says our cat has kidney failure judging by the tests. Has anyone ever had a cat that suffered from kidney failure? If so what did you find helpful if anything? Could it be something else? They apparently ruled out diabetes, and hyperthyrioidism but vets aren’t always right I have found. He drinks more water than normal, vomits a lot there was blood in his feces on a couple occasions. He urinates in the shower and floor drain which is odd. What do you think???
    they did two tests one was BUN and the other was creatine…one was 40 something and the other was 3.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi
      I assume a full blood panel was done. How high are the creatinine and bun?
      More info and a link to a group that can help. If your cat is in final stage please don’t follow this advice. Best of luck to you.
      Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure

      If your cat is not in final stages, this is not want you want to do. You do not want to put your cat on the
      Vets low protein diet. There are simply so many better options out there than to hand the poor cat a low amount of poor quality protein – which often results in a poor appetite and muscle wasting since the body is now robbing its own muscle mass to feed itself a decent quality and amount of protein.
      . There are new thoughts on this and the thinking is it is not the amount of protein but the quality of protein that matters.
      The Merck veterinary manual [www.merckvetmanual.com] says that cats need “4 g of protein of high biologic value per kg body wt/day”. That’s about 7 calories from protein per pound body weight per day. If a cat isn’t a good eater and consumes, say, 20 calories per pound per day, then 7/20 = 35% of calories can safely be from protein. It must be high quality protein, which means meat, fish, milk, and eggs, and not grain or soy.

      I am under the assumption that you have been feeding mostly dry foods. Many use a vegetable based protein instead of animal and that is part of the problem.. Your cat needs protein as it is a carnivore and cutting down on it will lead to other health issues and may cause faster degeneration.
      You want to cut down on phosphorous (no fish allowed now)

      The best way to do this is with a raw diet which you can make yourself or buy. (Making yourself is better) link provided at the bottom
      If you are unwilling to do that then something like the non fish flavors of Wellness or Merrick with NO grains are good alternatives. Wysong is also a good canned choice. This list gives a breakdown. Remember you want low phosphorous

      http://webpages.charter.net/katkarma/can…

      You also will want to look into phosphorous binders. Something like aluminum hydroxide
      Ask your vet or look into calcitrol

      You may want to talk to the vet about having injectable Pepcid AC on hand or you can buy it in pill form (ac not plain pepcid) and give 1/4 tab for stomach upset which happens a lot in crf cats due to acid in the stomach.
      I hope this stuff helps, here are many links for you
      Making cat food

      http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm

      other links. Read, read, read!!!!

      http://www.felineoutreach.org/EducationD…

      http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_chr…

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

      http://www.felinecrf.com/

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Felin…

      About that vets diet. This report is for dogs but applies to cats

      http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/21…

  5. QUESTION:
    Feline kidney disease: Are there any commercial foods I could mix with the expensive vet food to lower costs?
    I am currently paying for each 7 pound bag of veterinary food for my cat who was just diagnosed with early stage renal disease. I am very low income (I didn’t ask for this cat, but he came helpless into my life and I am trying to take the best possible care of him) and am hoping to find something cheaper on the market that I could MIX with this expensive food that my vet recommends highly for his condition. I understand that it is important that the food given to cats with this condition be LOWER in both PHOSPHORUS and PROTEIN than the common foods one generally sees for sale. I am hoping that someone knows of a less expensive commercially available food that I could mix with the “good for him” food that wouldn’t be too harmful and would help reduce my cost.

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    Umm, apparently my cat has early kidney disease? Any suggestions?
    My mother took my cat to a vet I had never heard of, behind my back, and apparently they diagnosed her with early kidney disease after a blood and urine test.

    What am I supposed to do?? I don’t feel like I believe them. I want to take her somewhere else and get her checked out again. All the vet said to do was to feed her this crappy Hill’s K/D food but my cat doesn’t like it. Isn’t this disease fatal?? I am in a little bit of shock since I just found out! Does anyone out there have any experience with feline kidney disease and possible options and treatments?? Thanks……
    Thank you to all who answered. I appreciate the different opinions. I’m still upset about hearing the news, but I feel a little better now. Thanks. =)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there,

      I am sorry to hear about your kitty and the diagnosis that the veterinarian who you never met made. Not knowing the practitioner I am sure is upsetting to you as well.

      As far as I am concerned, It is always a good idea, in my opinion, to get a second opinion if you are not confident with any practitioner. Blood and urine tests are generally used to make the diagnosis and are fairly accurate, but repeating them is prudent as well.

      Unfortunately, kidney disease in cats is fairly common as cats age. My 8 year-old Oriental Short hair was just diagnosed with possible early stages of kidney failure also, by two veterinarians that I really respect. While tests are all in normal range, some of the behavior he is showing, such as frequent urination and huge appetite for water points in the direction of this possibility. He is not Diabetic.

      I so agree with you about Hill’s products. They are really not good nutrition. It seems that many veterinarians prescribe these rx products, but in reality feline nutritional knowledge is very scanty. Veterinarians receive little training in this very important area, and most of it, I hear, is provided by some of the manufacturer’s of these products and want to be sure that vets keep their waiting rooms stocked with them. The product that he prescribed is low in protein but cats need to eat, and it is much more important to be sure that your cat is eating to avoid liver problems. In fact there is controversy about limiting protein with kidney problems, and in fact, may hasten the disease.

      Keeping your cat hydrated and not giving dry food is one way that you can help him a lot.

      I heartily recommend that you read this article which I found for you on the Original Holisticat site about renal conditions and the types of diet which are appropriate for our cats who have this problem. They are obligate carnivores and need meat. This is a fascinating and excellent explanation of the disease and possible ways to keep it at bay.

      http://www.holisticat.com/drjcrf.html

      There are many ways to prolong the life of your kitty. I had a cat with serious kidney failure and was able to prolong her life for several years, and as her disease progressed, we gave her sub-Q fluids which really helped spark her appetite and energy level. A caring and competent Vet will be able to train you how to do this when and if the time comes for it to be needed.

      I would suggest seeking an alternative care veterinarian practice to provide him with the most appropriate treatment.

      My veterinarian prescribed a suppliment called Feline Renal Support, made by Standard Process. I was happy to see that the article that I recommended agreed with her. While the jury is still out about whether he is in the early stages of the disease, we feel that taking proactive measures now may stave off its progression and bolster his kidney health.

      I hope I have given you some options to consider. I know how worried you are. Good luck with your kitty.

      Troublesniffer

  7. QUESTION:
    My cat has feline kidney failure, Is he in pain?
    My cat has a terminal illness called feline kidney failure, he just lays and sleeps all day. He lets us pick him up and hold him, but he can’t control his bladder any more and he moves real slow. I don’t know how much suffering he’s experiencing since he doesn’t act lie he’s in pain. But if he is suffering I don’t want to just let him suffer until he passes away. Does anyone know how this disease works?
    Thanks, akajwdolls

    • ANSWER:
      Kidney failure in humans is not painful. There’s a lack of energy and just like your cat they lay around and sleep and don’t have much of an appetite.

  8. QUESTION:
    My cat has advanced kidney disease – has anyone been able to reverse this?
    Quartarrah was just diagnosed yesterday after a routine blood test. They said her kidneys are only working a third of what they should be. They sent me home with a 10-day antibiotic and new K/D food.

    I was thinking perhaps a feline detox may help (any recipies?) and are there herbal remedies that could reverse this?

    I love my cat, and want to give her the best chance possible to survive this longer than the few months the vet said she’d last.

    She’s 14 years old and has been with me for 13 of them. She’s a very feisty calico and has endured much in her life. I know that if there is something out there that could help her, it would work, because she’s a fighter.

    If anyone has a similar story, please share!

    • ANSWER:
      There is a better alternative than k/d. After much research and my dog was on it for years, I found this. First let me say that you should research the ingredients of k/d. I have found that not all ingredients are safe for my dog. Not only that, but the company decreased the size of the can and the vet increased the price! My dog was severely overweight and we couldn’t get the weight off. I switched her to a different food and get has lost 6 pounds so far and is doing better! Her fur no longer feels oily and she is moving better ( she’s 16 this month). Now, I am not using the food I want and am recommending to you (due to availability in my area), but this is definitely something you should research: hi-tor neo diet for cats. http://www.waggintails.com/store/DisplayProduct.php?sku=HTCC-006
      Another great one is: http://www.flintriver.com/ProductInfo.asp
      Or: http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/felinekidney.htm
      I think any of these sites will help inform you and answer some of your questions. I think, also, that you will change your mind about Hill’s Science Diet. My dog has obviously lived many years eating Hill’s (she has been on various prescription diet foods for over 1/2 her life including c/d, s/d. w/d and k/d). But, I can see a better dog in her after just 4-6 weeks on a different, healthier food. At 16 and not a small dog, she is old and acts 1/2 her age. We hope to keep her around as long as we can, as I’m sure you want with your Quartarrah. Good luck!

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of Feline diabetes or kidney failure? I am worried about my kitty?
    I am going to call and see if the vet can get me in tomorrow, but here is what has gone on so far:
    My cat is is a 10 year old Manx. He has always been small but the last few weeks he is practically skeletal, I can feel every bone in his spine and hips. I weighed him yesterday and he was 7.5 lbs. He is an indoor/outdoor cat, and at first I thought it was just worms so I gave him a de-wormer about 1 1/2 weeks ago, and another follow up pill yesterday. It was “Drontal Plus”. He seems to be in really good spirits, and is acting practically normal, although I don’t usually see him as often as I do now because I am keeping him indoors for now. He is still playing, and cuddling. He doesn’t seem to be eating much at all, so I got him some a/d® Canine/Feline science diet food, which is a high calorie supplement. He ate about 1/2 can of that today. I have been reading a lot of scary things on the internet about diabetes and kidney disease, and it seems like he is drinking more water than normal. Do you think he could be drinking more because of the de-wormer, or is it a high possibility that he has a serious disease? Would he be acting normal if he did? He is up to date on all of his shots. I realize that I probably will not get a proper diagnosis on yahoo Answers, but what do you guys think?
    He turned out to be diabetic :(

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, drinking a lot and urinating a lot are symptoms of both. and yes at first it might be possible that they otherwise seem normal. That’s why it is good you are getting your cat buddy into the vet tomorrow.
      With kidney disease another common thing would be vomiting, maybe vomiting sort of clear or foamy fluid. also loss of appetite and thus weight loss.

      With diabetes, past a certain point, there is increase in appetite but even if they eat more. they lose weight . The coat gets dry and dandruffy. and then they might start getting weak in their legs. (from neuropathy — that is often reversible)

      If it’s diabetes it is very treatable, in fact many cats who are treated soon and get their blood sugar under control are able to go into remission and just be diet controlled. others only need a diet change to start with and that controls it.
      Even kidney disease seems to have come a long way and many cats are living years with it.

      Hang on to the following links.
      if he has diabetes check outhttp://felinediabetes.com/ , they have a lot of info on there and connected with the site is a very very active message board FDMB http://www.felinediabetes.com/FDMB/

      If it turns out to be kidney disease….There are 2 great sites that have been around a long time with tons of info. one is US one is UK so there is some country specific info but most applies to all cats

      http://www.felinecrf.com

      and http://www.felinecrf.org
      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-CRF-Support/ yahoo discussion list for people whose cats have kidney disease. You will probably find a lot of support and tips there.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why does my cat howl after eating, jumping up onto his perch and generally all the time?
    My cat was adopted by me when he was roughly 10 years old. He is now 19. He has a bit of a siamese look to him though he is black, and he yowls all the time just like one. But he has a very loud and annoying habit of yowling right after eating, almost triumphantly? and he yowls whenever he settles onto wherever he is going to sleep. He has now developed the pleasant habit of doing a shrill howling yell when he crawls under the bed every 30 minutes or every hour or so and at night it’s especially disturbing when me and my 9 month old baby are trying to sleep. What is causing him to yell all the time? I know he’s pretty old now, but he’s been this way pretty much since I got him 10 years ago.

    Also, he was diagnosed with feline kidney disease 3 years ago, and he has taken to hiding under the bed as of a couple of weeks ago. He comes out to eat, but he always acts all slinky, which has been going on for some months now.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid would be the most likely problem especially since he has kidney disease (This can causing them to yowl). A stomach or irritable bowel could be another reason. You can tell this in part if there’s runny stools especially if they have blood or mucous. The cramping they get makes them yowl. Take him to the vet with his stool and have them run a thryoid test, CBC and I would highly suggest checking his kidney values. Failing kidneys can eventually cause organ failure which is very painful also a cause for extra yowling. The fact that he’s hiding under the bed is huge indicator that he isn’t feeling well. For his sake and your rest take him to the vet and get some answers and ask for some of the tests I suggested. The vet will probably order them anyway. Thyroid and IBS are very treatable.

  11. QUESTION:
    Is it common for a vet to vaccinate an older sick cat?
    I have one pet (cat) that is 12 yrs old and is strictly an indoors. My cat is sick with inflammatory bowel disease, kidney disease, periodontal disease, and chronic constipation. My vet recently vaccinated him for feline distemper and rabies. He prefers the 1 year over the 3 year vaccination. My cat hides and has a diminished appetite. I have been a basket case for days. I really like my vet, but I don’t want to loose my cat.

    • ANSWER:
      A lot of vets prefer the 1 year cat vaccine because it’s less stressful on the cat’s body, and whether or not we would do a feline distemper on an indoor cat this age depends on how long it’s been since he had one. I don’t think either vaccine would aggravate his medical problems aside from the stress of being at the vet in the first place. This is really a judgment call, since I don’t know your cat’s full history I can’t really criticize your vet for giving the shots. I will say though, that where I work, the final decision on whether or not to give the shots falls on the owner. We try to provide you with the information you need to decide what is best for you and your pet.

  12. QUESTION:
    I need help understanding/interpreting feline blood test results. No guessing please.?
    I took my 13 yr old cat to the vet last week because she is having labored breathing. She seems fine, not distressed, eating fine but her breathing sounds bad and her sides retract each time she breathes. She was breathing very quick shallow breaths. The vet said it was asthma but wanted to do xrays and blood tests to be sure. Her blood test results were as follows:

    Test Result Reference Range Indicator
    ALB = 3.1 g/dL 2.3-3.9 Normal
    ALKP = 36 U/L 14-111 Normal
    ALT < 10U/L 12-130 No graph shown
    AMYL = 573 U/L 500-1500 Normal (at the low end of normal)
    BUN = 16 mg/dL 16-36 Low (on the line for low/normal, vet says Low)
    Ca = 9.1 mg/dL 7.8-11.3 Normal
    CHOL = 126 mg/dL 65-225 Normal
    CREA = 2.3 mg/dL 0.8-2.4 High? (inside the "normal" box but towards high end,
    vet says "High")
    GLOB = 3.7 g/dL 2.8-5.1 Normal
    GLU = 155 mg/dL 71-159 High (line between normal/high, vet says not a
    concern, it's just high because she's scared
    or nervous)
    PHOS = 5.1 mg/dL 3.1-7.5 Normal
    TBIL < 0.1 mg/dL 0.0-0.9 No graph shown
    TP = 6.8 g/dL 5.7-8.9 Normal

    HCT = 37.9% 24.0-45.0 Normal
    HGB = 11.5 g/dL 8.0-15.0 Normal
    MCHC = 30.3 g/dL 30.0-36.9 Low (line between low/normal)
    WBC = 25.2 x10^9/L 5.0-18.9 High
    GRANS = 22.0 x10^9/L 2.5-12.5 High
    %GRANS =87%
    L/M =3.2 x10^9/L 1.5-7.8 Normal
    %L/M = 13%
    PLT = 46 x10^9/L 175-500 Low
    Retics ~ 0.6%

    Her vet said she has CRF/kidney disease and told me to start her on Hill's Prescription Diet or if she wouldn't eat that (said a lot of cats won't) a recipe she gave me that consisted of liver, calcium carbonate, eggs and vegetable oil immediately. She said based on her creatinine levels my cat was in the 3rd of 4 stages and her kidneys would fail quickly if I continued with her current diet. She made it clear that I needed to start feeding her the new diet immediately. My cat won't eat it, any of it. She's always been a very picky eater. I went back and asked for a can of the prescription food, the vet tech sold me a can of a/d critical care formula, she ate this. I went back to get more and the vet said it was not good for her kidneys :^/ That she has to eat the k/d formula. I bought this and she won't touch it. I even tried adding tuna juice and she won't touch it.

    While researching what else she can eat, I noticed that her blood test results don't seem to be consistent with CRF test results. ie: her BUN is low/normal not high, HCT is normal, PHOS is normal

    I am wondering if anyone that knows veterinary medicine can answer this for me. I'm extremely concerned because she was eating fine before the diet change even with the labored breathing, now she won't eat any of the k/d foods and not more than a bite or two of anything else. The vet says if she won't eat the kidney diet to add water and force feed it to her from a squeeze bottle. This seems counterproductive (and painful for me, she doesn't like being force-anything) if she isn't in kidney failure. If she is, then I would really appreciate suggestions on alternatives to the aforementioned k/d food (tried can and dry) and the k/d liver recipe that she won't eat.

    She has had antibiotic and steroid shots for the lung infection. Plus the vet prescribed liquid antibiotics and probiotic paste to take home. My cat would let me give her the antibiotics to begin with because she didn't have much "fight" in her. Now she has it back and is fighting me when I give her the antibiotic. She won't touch the probiotic or any food that I put it in, even tuna (the bribe food/her fave). I've also been putting her in a crate and giving her albuterol nebulizer treatments followed by percussions. Her breathing is better than it was. But her respirations while laying down/resting are 55-60 breaths per minute.
    Vet did xrays because she felt "lumps" in her hind legs. Turned out to be nothing. The xrays did show "something" in her lungs (two hazy spots, one at the top edge of right lung and one on the towards the edge of the left lung) but the doctor said with her age she doesn't recommend surgery to find out if it is something "bad" or not. Just do antibiotics/nebs/percussions
    JC: Thank you so much for your reply. I appreciate you taking the time to read my entire question and to give an informed answer. She is family. I've had her since she was a tiny kitten and she means the world to me. My gut told me that something wasn't right with her diagnosis. Especially when she was looking at the xrays. She went up to the light board and stared at it, then moved really close and stared again for a bit and then said "there's something here..and here" pointing at the very light hazy spots but didn't tell me what that meant until I asked for more information. So, no, she did not send them to a radiologist. I had taken her in because of the breathing and she also had a hard spot under one of her nipples. We got a dog last year, so for the past year she doesn't live in my lap like she always has. Needless to say, when I was holding her, I felt the "tough" spot on her tummy/under the nipple. The vet seemed somewhat unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that
    unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that it was a "mammary tumor" which seems like something to be concerned about. She said if it gets any bigger to bring her back, but that was that. Velvet has always been a very healthy fiesty girl (she's a Russian Blue) but in the last couple of years she developed a small lump over her front right shoulder, it looks/feels like fluid filled skin, I was told by everyone this is nothing to be concerned about especially since it doesn't hurt her in the least to touch it, press it, etc. The vet said it wasn't anything to worry about either, just due to her getting older. She did say that because of the lumps in her legs and the hard spot in her tummy we should do xrays to make sure it wasn't a tumor in her lungs causing the breathing problems. I asked about the legs, because she didn't even mention them when reviewing the xray. She said "it's nothing, if it was, I would have told you".

    I was terrified when I went in. She seems to have

    • ANSWER:
      Time to find a new vet.

      Those aren’t the kidney numbers of a CRF cat. A better predictor of kidney health is to test the specific gravity of the urine – if it’s concentrated, the kidneys are functioning properly, if it’s too dilute, they are starting to age. The reduced kidney function is one of aging, and not a disease. A cat’s body craves and needs protein – that is why she is instinctively rejecting the K/D. Very few vets will prescribe a low-protein diet for cats with aging kidneys – they 1) won’t eat it 2) it leads to muscle wasting (the body needs to get protein from somewhere!) and 3) it hasn’t been proven that low-protein slows down the progression of the CRF. What she needs is to eat – a high quality canned food free of by-products and chemical preservatives. That’s what my vet recommends, based on the latest research. The by-products are hard to digest, and the chemicals are tough on the kidneys. Good canned foods will keep her better hydrated, and slow down the aging of the kidneys.

      Did the vet send the xrays out for a ‘real’ radiologist to interpret? Cats with asthma – untreated – can get hard spots in their lungs, and those will show up on xrays. It takes a real radiologist to interpret an xray – the answer is NOT surgery to find out what it is, it’s to have a qualified person read and interpret the xray. Personal story – my rescue rex was coughing prior to his coming to me, and was taken to the vet who did a chest xray, and diagnosed severe hear disease and wanted to do ultrasounds, etc. I insisted that the xrays were to be sent to a radiologist – diagnosis was asthma. Quite a bit different than the vet’s diagnosis of an aorta ready to self destruct.

      CRF is not a death sentence. And yours isn’t there yet. Feeding her a food she can’t stand is counterproductive, and can lead to liver failure when she refuses to eat. Find another vet, and feed her a quality canned food so that the poor thing eats! At 13 – with that pretty good bloodwork – she should have some good quality years left to spend with you.

  13. QUESTION:
    My cat Mr. is 12 years old and he keeps losing weight.?
    He has been tested for every problem on the planet Help I grew up with this cat and I don’t want to lose him. He is part Siamese and is very loving. He has been tested for poisoning, AIDS, Feline leukemia, distemper, kidney / liver disease FIP wet and dry, god I feel hopeless. I just don’t know what to do, if there is anyone out there that knows please I beg of you help!
    Thank you all for your support my mother had his put to sleep today. He was a real sweet cat and I apologize that I forgot to add this he was tested for thyroid disease and he did not have it. His Kidney levels were normal as well. The vet believes that he had a problem with his intestines and he would not properly absorb nutrients. If this is true that means our pet food could be to blame. I lost a four year old cat to chronic renal failure. That is not right. Does anyone have any opinions?
    Thank you all for your support my mother had him put to sleep today. He was a real sweet cat and I apologize that I forgot to add this he was tested for thyroid disease and he did not have it. His Kidney levels were normal as well. The vet believes that he had a problem with his intestines and he would not properly absorb nutrients. If this is true that means our pet food could be to blame. I lost a four year old cat to chronic renal failure. That is not right. Does anyone have any opinions?

    • ANSWER:
      Seems like your vet can’t diagnose the problem! Take him to see another vet. Some vets are really incompetent!

  14. QUESTION:
    Can cats get Parkinson’s disease?
    I’m a junior doctor, but not a vet so all I can do is guess when it comes to diagnosing our cat!

    He’s old (17) but in good health, still pretty active etc. He was at the vet recently who did a whole host of blood tests to check his kidney function etc and reckoned he had a good few years left in him. He does seem to have feline dementia though…….

    Anyway, he has this weird kind of twitch sometimes, in his head and one of his front paws, and he sometimes seems to “freeze” in one position for 20 seconds or so, then he just gets on with whatever he was doing.

    In my opinion, he has symptoms kind of suggestive of Parkinson’s disease, but I don’t know whether cats can get that. If so, is there any treatments for it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a dog that had seizures and his mild ones he would do what you described. But I’m not saying that’s what it is. Did you ask the vet? Because that’s really a good question you obviously love your kitty and he is well taken care of to be 17.

  15. QUESTION:
    Why do cats get CRF/ kidney failure?
    Why do cats more commonly experience CRF (chronic renal failure, kidney failure) vs. humans? I know the science, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment, etc, etc, but why are felines in particular prone to this disease? Just curious.

    • ANSWER:
      It really goes to their diet. Cat food is full of filler lacking nutrition.

  16. QUESTION:
    Does this sound like feline hypothyroidism, or something else?
    Trying to diagnose my cat before the vet does. I have the zillionth appointment today with my senior male feline. He is 16. He was diagnosed with CRF two years ago. Blood test two days ago shows everything within the normal levels (including phosphorus, glucose, liver, kidney) EXCEPT he is a little anemic. He is blind in the only eye he has–at the time his retina detached he was diagnosed with hypertension. He takes a pill to regulate that but his vision did not return. When he was first found to be anemic, he was also diagnosed with a red blood cell infection (yes, red blood cell infection – mycoplasma turicensis and another one that started with an hae…). He took an antibiotic for a month but has not been retested to see if it’s been cleared up. This weekend, he had diarrhea and was vomiting. His back legs are also weak. Today’s tests will be a T4 for thyroid specifically and possibly xrays for some sort of GI disease/cancer. Can any of his symptoms be in line with a thyroid issue? Or could the mycoplasma issue be cancer related but the rest of his bloodwork was normal? For the diarrhea, they gave him some fluids that seemed to have at least temporarily helped him feel and “go” better, but his hind legs are still weak. Thoughts? (Prayers and miracles also welcome. I know he’s old, but if he can be made to feel better for a little longer, I’d love that.)

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is relatively rare in cats, and it is not considered fatal, although it can affect a cat’s quality of life and IT IS common in older Cats..but the vomiting and diarrhea really has nothing to do with hypothyroidism. This cat has lived a long life, be very happy for it, but also sense/find if he is in pain if you are going to be self-diagnosing too. Because if he is, you wouldn’t want him to suffer any longer either, of course?

      Symptoms of hypothyroidism are weight gain, dull coat and general lethargy..not vomiting, weak legs and diarrhea.

  17. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had a cat get sick 2 weeks after being vacinated?
    I took my cat in two weeks ago for his senior wellness. My cat is 12 yrs. and has Inflammatory bowel disease, kidney disease, and chronic constipation. His kidney condition is secondary to the Inflammatory bowel disease. My doctor administered both the rabies 1yr and feline distemper (FVRCP). My cat did not seem to be doing well. So, 4 days later I bring him back to a different vet. To my surprise, he does not have a fever but he is given benadryl, and antibiotic and a steroid; He seems just like normal till the following day. It has been two weeks since his vaccinations, he is still hiding, lethargic, and there is a loss in appetite. However, he is eating, drinking, urinating, defecating etc. Unfortunately, I am the reason my cat is sick. I inquired about my cat rabies vaccines and the vet vet decided to administer both vaccines. I have no one to blame but my self. Now my cat is sick and I don’t know if he will ever get better. Do you think he will pull through?

    • ANSWER:
      One of my cats got his second round of shots and he got so sick later that night (vomiting, etc) and we had to bring him to the emergency vet. He was given benadryl and steroids. The vet said it was an allergic reaction to the shots, probably because both were done at the same time.

  18. QUESTION:
    BARF diet for Cats…anyone?
    I have a male adult cat who has been troubled by a horrible illness called Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) I was told by the vet he’d end up with cancer in the colon. Yes, he had chronic colitis, a problem in the large intestine which was causing my pet bleed through the rectum and horrible, nonstop diarrhea. My kitty was getting weary of his suffering and I was getting so, so tired of throwing away bed sheets, cleaning after him every day sometimes 2 times a day. I could not sleep well just thinking of what else I could have possibly found dirty in the house. He never went outside the box, but all that blood, with colon mucose coming out he could not control. My cat got to a point where he could not sit down comfortably, and there was bloody diarrhea in his tail, kitchen counter, tables, furniture etc ALL THE TIME.

    I did not want to watch my cat give up and not do anything, so I did some research and finally switched him to a species appropriate diet: cooked or raw meat with bones, organs and probiotics and digestive enzymes. I now am keeping all my cats on the BARF diet, always making sure I get fresh food from animals which were not cured or injected with substances to keep the meat fresh. I also make sure to keep the phosphorus-calcium ratio right, and it’s been a year now since I have not seen signs of IBD. My cat’s stools are formed and healthy. My vet says my cat looks incredibly fine.

    So, I just wanted to see how many follow this diet and what you think of it. I am aware of the risks, like toxoplasmosis, but my cat was dying in front of my eyes on Science Diet, Purina, Iams, Prescription foods like Hill’s z/d etc, and many, many more expensive commercial foods and not one helped my poor feline. He was on antibiotics and prednisone all the time and nothing ever worked! So, I learned that cats are obligate carnivores and need to eat other animals to live a better life. I have noticed too many cases of IBD, Diabetes, Obesity, UTI, Kidney Disease, and cancer, all because we’re feeding species inappropriate foods to our precious pets. The number of sick ones keeps increasing, and we are responsible.

    Anyone trying out this diet? I’d love to hear some of your experiences.
    If anyone is interested, this website I’m about to provide is one of the best and I am a client of them. I encourage everybody to take a look. Their service is high quality. Thank you ladies!

    www.hare-today.com

    • ANSWER:
      When I first was investigating the raw diets I was on groups where people reported that many cats would be “cured” of IBD within 48 hours. I have had no experience of that with my cats so I’m happy to hear another testimonial to the efficacy of a raw meat diet for cat health.

      I too only do a 50% raw diet. Right now I am down to my last frozen “muffin” of raw chicken. No hearts at the store today. When I called the market where I get my turkey parts last week they had just cleaned out the turkeys and thrown away the hearts and livers to use with the turkey.

      Also, having acquired two kittens this summer I am going through the raw meat mixture at double the speed I am used to.

      I do think the diet has extraordinary benefits for cat health.

  19. QUESTION:
    Euthanasia, I wish I could go back in time?
    I had a six month old kitten named Sully, and he recently came down with some type of illness. He was uncordinated, and had a hard time walking on his hind legs. He lost his appetite a bit and was very lethargic. So of course, we brought him to the vet. The vet was a very nice, friendly, experienced man…you could just tell…and he was actually kind of puzzled at his symptoms. He mentioned many possible causes and took an xray, and the only thing it revealed was that he was quite a bit constipated. He said it could be a possible neurological problem, that there’s swelling in the brain (possible tumor causing his back muscles not to cooperate with him aka he couldnt push the poop out, had a hard time walking…etc.) The vet had no certain diagnosis at this point, but said a shot cortozone?> should help with any swelling, so we gave it a try. It didn’t work. He got worse and worse, so we made another appointment. As days, even HOURS went by he got worse and worse. Two days before the appointment, we knew we couldnt wait. Sully was throwing up EVERYTHING (i forget to mention an antibiotic the vet gave him for possible infection? Well…he threw it up about three minutes after we gave it to him.) His back legs were cold and he was dragging, could walk maybe two or three steps and then his legs would give out. It was awful!!! He peed all over the floor and himself and had no control over it! My poor baby looked like he was slipping away, so we rushed him to the Animal ER clinic. They saw him right away and his head was bobbing around and he was just so ill, I can’t describe it. When the vet saw him she almost shunned us like “Whats the emergency” kind of attitude. Then ten minutes later the vet assistant walks in and hands us a bill for 800 dollars and explains what they want to do. Keep him on an IV all night among other things, blood tests…etc. She could see how bad off he was and then she mentioned euthanizing him. My mom and I started crying, and asked how we could pay this…because we did not have 800 dollars, but they basically said even if, its not worth it. He probably won’t recover (and at this point im wondering from WHAT??) The vet was very, very rude, but the assistant was nice and told us that he wouldnt make it until thursday and assured my mom that euthansia was probably the best option. She gave us maybe five minutes to talk it over, and wham my mom says okay, we get the papers and sign him over. I wanted to scream at the top of my lungs. We could have figured SOMETHING out for the money, and he still had a chance. I was just in such shock that I didnt say anything, I just held my kitty and cried. They didn’t even let us fill out the care credit form to give the overnight thing a try. She told us we were making the right decision, but I never found out what was wrong. It could have been a persistant little virus that had gotten very bad, even if it was feline lukemia, he still had a fighting chance and there are organizations willing to help people with huge vet bills who just dont have the money!! They just took him from my arms and god knows what happened from there, i didnt even get to see it. Then we were just left to leave, not knowing what he had or if maybe it was treatable (possibly easily). And quite honestly i would have rathered him die at home, snuggled on my bed rather then on a medical table with a needle. And if he made it until…tomorrow actually….then maybe or vet could have helped OR said the same thing, which I’m sure he would have been much more sympathetic and sweet about it. He was also willing to work with us with money, he covered the money for his antibiotics, such a sweet, sweet man! He doesnt even know yet, and me and my family are left wondering what was going on? Did he really have cancer? Kidney disease? Infection??? I feel terrible, I should have stopped it from happening, but me being the kind of dumb person i am just let it happen. I layed there the whole ride to the vet and promised Sully that I wouldnt let him die! And now he’s dead! … Please help me, did my mom and I make the right decision?? Or did he have a heck of a chance?? What could this have been?? It just doesnt add up….and how do I get over it?

    • ANSWER:
      my advise to you cry, yes cry don’t let the feeling inside, it may cause a mental breakdown, yes you did the right decision, at least your family took him to the vet, and let him die with no pain, we normal ppl don’t know whats Euthanasia and we think its another word of cruelty, while its not..
      to make you feel better of yourself, last year i took my precious Leila to a vet to get medicine, she had a cat cold, and the doc gave her a dog medicine by mistake, it was an injection, and she was 4 months old, couldn’t handle the big dose, so she start falling sick, the med damaged her liver, she start getting sicker and sicker, i took her to the another vet and they told me Euthanasia is the only solution, i had to look for another vet that will agree to fight for my baby, till i found, i put her there, “which i wish i didn’t” the doc told me that i’m just buying time and wasting money, as she was eating throw tubes, to get fluids in her system, and my ignorant was telling me not to stop it, going there seeing her suffering, but i was stupid not to stop it, till one day she gave up, she just died after 1 week of all this drama, and here i am left full of guilt, went thru mental breakdown, i believe we both cant let go, cause we still have this question, WHY? but we shouldn’t forget that we all gonna die, so you should let go, i know it must be hard for you, i feel the same, me too i wish that i left her pass away next to me, enjoying my cuddle, but its not our choice, its a destiny thing, we absolutely have no choice with, so cry and remember the lovely memories, you at least tried while others just give their cats for adoption just because they can’t bother litter trained them??? my prayers and heart go for you ! RIP Leila

  20. QUESTION:
    HELP DRY CAT FOOD BAD?????????!!!!!!?
    Ok im concerned. I was looking for a good quality dry cat food, and this is what People have said:

    “The rise in the use of dry food has also seen the rise in diabetes.kidney disease, crystals ect in cats. Take it from someone whose cat got diabetes from eating dry food. I have also worked on a feline diabetes board and have seen literally more then hundreds of examples of what happens to the blood glucose when dry food is fed and when a switch is made. Dry food is NOT better for teeth, most are loaded with carbs and corn that cats may have trouble processing and 95% of the moisture is zapped out of the dry during processing. I can give you a million other reasons.”

    “Technically no dried food is good for cats or dogs…when they drink water it causes the food to expand in their stomach’s so should be avoided”

    Should i not feed my kitties Solid Gold, or Blue Buffalo Dry food then? What if i buy a cat water fountain to entice them to drink more? Is dry food really Bad?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes I am afraid that a completely dry food diet is bad for your cat and I speak from experience – I have one cat with struvite crystals and another with diabetes (both having been adopted late in life and having had a predominently dry diet). Cats in the wild are not programmed to drink very much as they obtain most of the moisture they need from their prey. Domestic cats are no different and are notorious for not drinking enough. The combination of this and the grains/fillers and carbohydrates in dry food can be potentially life threatening. Dry food was invented for humans and not for cats. It doesnt smell as much as wet food, it is easier to leave out all day with no messy bowls and, because of the fillers (drop some dry food in water and see what happens), the cat eats less making the customer think it is good value for money.

      Of course, not every cat fed a dry diet will die because of it, but you have to look at the facts (and the fact is that dry food is NOT beneficial for their teeth – they hardly even chew it anyway).

      Unfortunately, I do have one cat who refuses to eat anything other than dry food so I am trying to switch her to Orijen which is completely grainless and is high protein/lo carb. If your cat does like wet food then research good makes on the internet (I use Bozita which is Swedish and is mostly meat, again with no grains/fillers).

      A water fountain is a very good idea – all my 6 cats love theirs and it does entice them to drink more as it stays fresh and they seem to like the movement of the water.

      I will get loads of thumbs down for this – I always do – as my opinion is that feeding a completely dry diet is simply lazy – a cat is a carnivore and needs MEAT not dry rubbish. There will be people saying “my cat is very healthy” and I sincerely hope that this continues but diabetes usually comes on later in life so there is every possibility that one day it might happen to their cat.

      You have done your research well – trust what it is telling you.

      Edit – Law L – No-one has said that the cat’s stomach EXPANDS. It is the food which expands, making the cat feel full and hence it eats less and hence its cheap miserable owner thinks it is good value.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is going on with my cat’s eye?
    My inside cat is having trouble with her eye. It looks swollen, she can’t fully close it and her third eye is showing. The part right above, below and on the side of her eye feels really hard but on the other eye, it’s soft. Her eye looks kind of cloudy and very teary. She doesn’t act like she’s in any pain but she’s sneezing alot. Anyone have any idea what could be going on?

    I took her to the vet to see if she had an eye infection and they did all kinds of tests on her because I’ve had her for 23 years. Her tests came back showing that she had a urinary tract infection, kidney disease and hyperthyroidism but the doctor could not figure out what was wrong with her eye. She told me to take her to an feline opthamologist and get an MRI.

    The problem is, the tests that they’ve already run on my cat cost 0, before any medication. I am out of work right now and can’t afford to take her to another doctor until I find another job but I don’t want to just ignore her problem. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      why don’t you spend the money on a feline opthamologist? Of course it’s your choice.Maybe the opthmologist can suggest a different eye medicine.Might it be glaucoma that’s making her eye hard or perhaps a tumor in the eye?Maybe the opthamologist can make her eye a bit more comfortable.The regular vet can treat her for hyperthyroidism very easily with one or two pills a day.The urinary tract infection can be treated with antibiotics.The kidney diasease I assume is chronic and she can be fed Science Diet for kidney problems(I don’t know what exactly it’s called; is it KD for cats?) .All these treatments will give her the care she needs right now and extend her life a bit.
      No one here can recommend a new vitamin or medication for your cat.That’s for your vet to do.What does the vet recommend for her now?I’m surprised he didn’t advise you what to do?
      She’s so old that it’s almost unheard of for cats to live that long and you know she’s at the end of her life.The responsibility you have towards her now is to make her more comfy till she passes on.

  22. QUESTION:
    Feline Acute Renal Failure Onset?
    I just got back from the vet who diagnosed my cat with acute renal failure. He recommends subQ fluids for 10 days, 1 mg of antibiotics per day, and 5 mg of pepcid acid for the nausea. This is a very serious condition and I am scared for him. At the office they gave him a shot of antibiotics, famotidine, and took blood to assess kidney values. Despite the famotidine, he vomited hours later. Is this normal?

    Looks like we caught the disease within 4 days of its onset… however, I am worried that this is still too long and that he will suffer permanent kidney damage if he survives. Has anyone gone through this and how likely are his chances of survival if we caught it within 4 days? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I understand that this is overwhelming, but it will bring you much closer to your kitty in the end. Giving subq fluids is not much fun for either you or the cat. It helps if the fluids are warmer, you might want to google around about giving fluids (that is if you have decided to do it yourself)

      You do not say WHY your cat has renal failure. you don’t say what your vet thought the prognosis is. Can your cat survive, I would say yes, or your vet would have told you that it would be better to put the cat down now.

      I wouldn’t worry about the vomiting after the famotidine. Yes, we would prefer the kitty not vomit, but sometimes it is in the cat’s best interest. Hopefully it won’t happen again.

  23. QUESTION:
    ****Desperate Situation****What to do with a feral cat with feline Stomatitis who won’t eat?
    I have a feral cat that was diagnosed with feline stomatitis. This started 4 months ago when she stopped eating. I took her to the vet where he has given her a shot of Depo Medrol and and Depopan (1/2cc of each) and along with amoxicillin that I am to put into her food when she starts eating again. Usually within a 24 hour period after getting the steroids she is able to eat again. She stays pain free for about a month and then stops eating, but once she gets that injection again she is fine. I’ve been doing this with her for 4 months now and she stays pain free for a month. This last time, being the fourth time she stopped eating again and the shot only kept her pain free for about 11 days (took her to the vet Dec.1st and by Dec 12th she stopped eating). So again I took her back he gave her another shot and gave me Prednisone liquid to put in her food on the 9th or 10th day.. Well the next day after her injection she ate half a can of moist canned food and now it’s the day after that and she won’t eat at all again. Is she now immune to the steroids? Can anyone suggest what I can do to help her. She is a feral cat so i cannot give her anything orally at all, she will bite or scratch me. I can only put it in her food and now she won’t eat. HELP!!!! Also she won’t drink any liquids at all since this problem started 4 months ago. Are there foods out there that she would absolutely be attracted to to eat? I’ve tried baby food, sardines, tuna fish, yogurt I even put the fish in a blender with water for a smooth consistency, but nothing works, she won’t eat any of these things. I’m really concerned because she gets the water she needs only from the food she eats and if she is not eating that will affect her kidneys. If anyone can please help me at all I would appreciate it. Also, I’ve contacted the vet and I’m waiting for a phone call back. If anyone knows of any questions I should ask him, that would be great. I’ve looked up this disease on Google and everyone is suggesting tooth extraction. If that was the answer would it be a full tooth extraction or partial? All I know is that her condition is severe. Thanks to all who can help me..

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you’ve done a lot for this kitty. And it sounds like you’ve tried the best, stinkiest, most appetizing foods. Unfortunately with feral cats, sometimes there is only so much you can do.
      Even if you could afford for her to have the dental and she had her teeth extracted, which, as you’ve read is really the only solution, she would need a place to recover from anesthesia and to be administered pain medications for a few days. Full or partial tooth extraction would depend on what the vet sees once he is inside the mouth. And, again, where she is feral, he might decide to take out all the teeth since this is a progressive disease and even if all her teeth aren’t affected now, they will be in the future and she’ll be in the same boat again.
      It’s a tough decision really. And who’s to say there isn’t anything else wrong with her. She could have a number of issues going on. Cancer comes to mind, especially where she responded to steroids. With steroid treatment it works until it doesn’t. Sometimes animals do well on long courses for months and years while sometimes it will only help them for a short while as the disease takes over.
      I would talk to your vet to see if he thinks anything else is going on with her and also ask him if he thinks extractions will solve her problem. Dental procedures are usually VERY expensive.
      Good luck.

  24. QUESTION:
    Anyone with experience in feline renal failure?
    I’m pretty familiar with what my cat does when he’s having a bad day. He is 16 years old (approx) and has 75% function of at least one kidney. He’s on sub q twice a week as well as Pepcid AC 1/4 tablet every other day (if I can get him to take it). We also added Lax’Aire a few weeks ago to stop weekly vomiting. He has been doing very well. Today came home from work and he did not greet me. As I walked towards the bedroom I noticed white vomit stains on the floor. Marmalade was on the bed surrounded by small vomit stains and diarrhea stains. He is lethargic and really hasn’t done anything since I got here. I know he has bad days but this is the worse day yet. I don’t want to drag him out tonight to a strange vet as our is already closed. I can zip in tomorrow morning and have him looked at when they open. Does anyone have experience with renal failure? My question is: is it normal for this to happen as he progressives in the disease? Normally I would think he had UTI but he doesn’t appear to be straining. He hasn’t eaten anything but I’ve only been home for an hour. Can anyone tell me what to expect and if you have any idea what is wrong?
    I don’t understand how he could be near the end. We had x-rays and full blood work done in the last month. The only change was his heart mummer went from level 1 to level 2. He had actually gained 1/4 lb and the Vet was very pleased. He was hydrated and looked very healthy considering. He hasn’t taken his Pepcid this week cause ….. well he doesn’t want anymore pill pockets. If happens every once in a while and I think it may have thrown his stomach off. I felt his stomach and he didn’t flinch or yelp like he usually does when it’s an infection. He just looks tired and sleepy. I’ll do the sub q tonight and bring him in first thing in the morning. Thank you everybody for the information.

    • ANSWER:
      I have included a link that you might find very helpful, if you are not already aware of it.

      What is wrong could be a few things, and it could be totally unrelated to his renal failure. I don’t know what part of the country you are in, but where I am in the boonies of New York, there has been a mild intestinal flu going around, which of course, appears more serious in a comprimised cat.

      Rusty had a diseased kidney removed six years ago, with the other kidney starting to fail — a cat can live well on 30% function, and he has about 40% after the removal of the other kidney. On top of that, he has IBD.

      That said, Rusty turned 18 yesterday. We have our good days, and we have our bad days. However, we have more good days now than we did a year ago. A year ago I moved all the cats onto a partial raw diet and found great improvement in all their health. I haven’t given Rusty a subQ in over a year, and only a little baking soda now and then (in Rusty’s case, the Pepcid damaged his ability to produce any stomach acids). I add a non-pancreas enzyme supplement to everything he eats. Diet is key in helping a cat with renal failure. While I have seen low-protein diets recommended, personally, I found a high-protein diet best overall. I also do my best to make sure his body is pH balanced, and this is where the baking soda comes in (or a little apple cider vinegar), as it seems when he becomes too acidic is when we have more problems, but getting the body back to a more alkaline state really helps. But every cat and every case is different.

      Each cat responds differently to renal failure and there are so many other factors, including type of food, quality and how your cat responds to it. Rusty responds best on, are you ready for this, Fancy Feast (the non-gluten varieties, of course).

      As things progress, these things do happen. The key is to find what works for your cat. In my case, it took a few years, but we are doing very, very well, thank you.

      I urge you to look beyond the link I gave you and read some of the information out there on CRF. I also urge you to join a YA group devoted to the subject of renal failure. Look at alternative diets and treatments.

      Good luck, and may your cat give you many more days, weeks, months and years to come.

      http://www.felinecrf.com/managd.htm

  25. QUESTION:
    Cat is still urinating and defecating outside the litter box?
    I took him to the vet. They’ve done all kind of test! Gave him a antibiotic injection. After I got him home he seemed worse. He’s very lethargic, disoriented, almost none respondent. He’s even turning in circles counter clock wise. I’m so frustrated and it’s hurts me to see him suffer so much and the vet still doens’t know what’s wrong with him. He says it’s not his kidney’s, not his liver, he dosen’t have the feline diseases. So what’s wrong with him. HELP ME SAVE MY CAT!

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    My cat has blood in her urine and seems to be evacuating small peaces of tissue as well.?
    She is an older cat, over ten, and has been an indoor cat and our only pet for most of her life, before that she was the pet of our local vet so she was spayed by her and tested for pretty much all feline diseases and came up clean. She has always drunk a large amount of water and regularly urinates so I hoped this would help avoid the kidney and bladder problems that haunt older cats.
    But two days ago she suddenly had trouble urinating, she would try to go but would just shake a bit and obviously be distressed. I was quiet worried but she seemed fine by the next day, and was urinating like normal and drinking just as much water as ever. I felt her abdomen and her bladder doesn’t seem to be overly distended and there is no tenderness, so she is fully emptying her bladder. But all of a sudden this evening she just began urinating all over with little control, then a few hours later she seemed to be trying to go again but only let out a very small amount and it had blood in it, and most distressing there seems to be some small peaces of tissue as well. This has happened four times so far, I have collected the peaces so I can show them to our vet but I’m worried right now and want to find out what is wrong.
    The tissue is bright red, not porous, I was hoping perhaps she passed a bladder or kidney stone and this was just some necrotic tissue, but it seems very healthy unfortunatly.
    Hopefully someone can provide me with some information, and sorry that this was not more brief but I tried to keep it small.
    Her seeming trouble urinating only lasted for about half a day. Also I live in the mountains, the nearest vet to me is a three hour drive from here and I know she isn’t in right now. And my cat gets very stressed from the drive so I want to avoid that if possible, tomorrow I’m calling our vet to come up here as soon as she can, but I don’t know when that will be. I’m just trying to gather what information I can till I can get in touch with her.

    • ANSWER:
      There are no two ways about this, your cat needs to be seen by a veterinarian. Your cat needed veterinary attention two days ago when these symptoms first showed up. The best thing to do is to contact a QUALIFIED veterinarian – not some strangers on the internet who could jerk you around at worst, and at best have no qualifications – whether or not the situation is so urgent it is worth the three hour drive NOW, or whether it can wait until your vet can get to you.

  27. QUESTION:
    Vets & vet nurses – why are Uk vets crap at treating feline crf?
    Despite my inflamatory – sounding question I’m really not vet bashing here – I’d just like some feedback from those who may be ‘in the know’. My cat was diagnosed with crf in May. If I’d believed my vet’s initial prognosis I’d have probably put her to sleep then. Instead I researched everything about crf and discovered that far from being an automatic death sentence many cats can live happy, good quality lives for a long time after diagnosis. In America vets seem to take a much more proactive approach, routinely prescribing subcutaneous fluids & supportive meds instead of having the negative attitude towards the disease that our vets have. Most UK vets (wrongly) think sub q fluids are ineffective, cruel & affect the cat’s quality of life. Since I started my cat on them her kidneys values have stabilised, her appetite, activity levels & general demeanour have all become virtually normal again – so why are uk vets so reluctant to see crf as something “treatable” ?
    Indianna: “Basic palliative care” is what I’m giving & I do this because “gentle euthanasia” just isn’t an option yet for a cat who’s eating well, gaining weight, playing, purring and wanting cuddles. Should I offer no symptomatic relief at all & let her die a “long painful death” or euthanize her prematurely? Which one would be most ethically acceptable to you? I don’t think I know more than her vet – he’s a good vet who listens to my concerns and shares his medical expertise but is also open to new treatment ideas. Initially though he had that same grim outlook you have & mentioned pts IMO way too soon. One thing pet owners hate are vet personnel who won’t consider new ideas & are arrogant enough to think their way is “the only way”, assume they know animals better then the owners do and assume people who want to help their animals only ever do it for selfish reasons.

    Angie: Thank you for understanding! Give your special girl a little hug from me & take care xx

    • ANSWER:
      I don’t have an answer but wanted to offer encouragement. My cat was diagnosed almost 2.5 years ago with CRF. She is, for the most part, doing very well. This week she’s had a little tummy upset but otherwise she is fine. Her weight is good, her coat is shiny, she’s very healthy for 15 years old. She’s only had to have subq fluids once so far and that was almost a year ago. As long as your cat still has a good quality of life, there is no reason to consider PTS. Good for both you and your cat that you are so proactive. If you need a support group, there is a really good one on Catster.com. Good luck to you and your kitty.

  28. QUESTION:
    Cat drooling, vomiting, vet doesn’t know what’s wrong?
    My cat is 14 years old, she goes outdoors, has arthritis, never has hairballs, and has recently been seriously ill. The vet has done tests for poisoning (negative, and it’s been almost a month now), various diseases (feline leukemia, FIV, all sorts of things, also all negative), he’s taken X-rays (didn’t show any blockage)… Her kidney functions are high, if anything, and she has kidney stones and a heart murmur, but we don’t see how that could have anything to do with her vomiting.

    She’s been on an anti-nauseant. The first week she was on it she was fine, then when the drug wore off she was still just fine for a few days. She got sick again, though. We’ve asked around the neighbourhood and nobody’s left out any antifreeze or anything like that, as far as they can remember, though of course that’s not entirely reliable.

    She’s on the anti-nauseant again… and for the past two weeks or so (yes she’s been sick three-four weeks) she’s been fine, but yesterday she started vomiting and drooling again (she’s not hiding away yet though). Either the anti-nauseant has lost its effect, she ate a whole lot of grass or something (my mum did see her consuming vast quantities of catnip) to induce vomiting, or whatever the problem is can no longer be covered up by the drug.

    What we’re trying right now is changing her food (we give her both the pâté and the kibble/crunchy stuff, but we’re talking about the kibble here) because it might have been a bad batch… it’s hard to keep her inside though because when she starts throwing up we put her out, and sometimes she goes off for awhile and we don’t know what she might get into.

    Does anyone have any recommendations or… anything?

    • ANSWER:
      If she can’t control her drool maybe it’s something neurological… my mom is an eeg tech (for humans) and a lot of her seizure patients vomit. Just a theory.

  29. QUESTION:
    Post mortem revealed my cat died from Lymphoma, should my vet have seen this after 4 weeks of hell?
    took Hugo (6 year old long haired cat, on my profile pic) to the vets for his booster on 30th Jan 2010. He had been off his food a bit that week but I thought it was due to the tins he sometimes goes off but apart from that seemed fine. They gave him his injection and a worming tablet and we went home. Got home and he was playing in the garden. Come tea time he was in his bed, we went out and didn’t think anything of it. Got back at midnight and he hadn’t moved, I knew something was wrong and came down in the night to check on him. The next day he clearly had a fever and was breathing fast. My friend who is a vet nurse said it could have been his booster. Rung the vets but they said “it definitely won’t be the booster”. He seemed a bit better Monday but then worse on Tuesday so I took him to vet. His temperature was 104.6!! They gave him some metacam and an antibiotic injection and sent him home. He had been off his food totally and went straight home to eat, thank goodness! The next day he seemed to be going back down hill yet again. Took him back to the vets, they kept him in on a drip and next morning he was raging to get out and came home, bright as a button! By Sunday he was quiet again, not eating much, obviously not well. Took him back to vets that week, (temperature 103.8) they kept him in and did more bloods (bloods for first week showed low white cell count and high urea but nothing major). They kept him in for three days, tested leukemia and FIV, both negative. Did more bloods second week and they were normal. Hugo didn’t respond to metacam (painkiller to reduce temperature) or the drip during the first 24 hours, he only showed improvement with steroids. By Thursday he seemed a bit better and came home but I knew he wasn’t right. I had asked about all kinds of diseases, including lymphoma, Feline peritonitis, inflamed bowel disease, all the major cat illnesses (leukemia etc.) but the vets didn’t seem to think anything seemed familiar. Female vet said, “he’s not losing enough weight for anything serious”. I asked for an Xray and ultrasound scan but they said it wasn’t necessary. Went back in on Saturday for another steroid injection. By following Friday he was the same, went back again and they gave him methodone, I was beside myself at this point. They said that they thought his kidneys were swollen but kidney function on bloods were normal. He was eating little bits but not much, he had gone from 3.82kg to 3.61kg. I went home that weekend and nursed him all I could, I let him sleep with me in the spare room, I knew he was seriously unwell. Monday morning came and I was back at the vets with him, asking them to take him in on the drip as I knew this had helped before. They were suspecting pancreatitis. Tests done for this and more bloods showed negative for pancreatitis and some deterioration in the kidneys function. I was begging for a scan, they just kept shooting me down and saying a scan wouldn’t show anything. On Wednesday afternoon female vet rang me and said that they wanted to operate, despite not doing the scan that I had requested so many times. I agreed to it but when I went to the vets that night to see my darling Hugo they had been arguing about whether to operate and the male partner in the vets over ruled the female as we were then waiting for pancreatitis test to come back. Test came back negative on 25th Feb so they were planning on operating on 26th Feb to see if they could see anything. When I got there that Thursday evening to see my soulmate Hugo he was in severe pain, could hardly breath and it broke my heart to see him like that. They gave him more methadone to ease the pain which it did. He had another session of difficulty breathing at 10.30pm that evening, they managed to settle him with oxygen and methadone but he died as he yelled out in pain at 11.00pm. I am totally devasted. R.I.P. Hugo, my best friend, I miss you dearly xx

    I am beating myself up about this, I took him to a trusted vet, did all the research I could, took advice whilst Hugo was in hospital from two other vets. Everyone seemed to draw a blank. All I know is that I was desperate for that scan. Could anyone tell me what they think Hugo could have died from? If I could have done anything different and more importantly what the vets should have done to help him? I feel the vets have let him down terribly :-(

    Post mortem results revealed my dear Hugo died from Lymphoma in his kidneys, lungs and a lesion in his pancreas. I feel so sorry for my little boy suffering, truly I do, my pathologist told me a scan would have shown this. How do vets diagnose lymphoma?

    • ANSWER:
      There is absolutely nothing your vet could have done to save poor Hugo with all that cancer in his little body even if he’d had the scan earlier. It is heatbreaking to see a loved pet in pain but being angry with the vet achieves nothing. Try to understand that they really were doing the best they could for him. All they would have been able to do with an earlier diagnosis is to put him to sleep sooner. Don’t beat yourself up about this any more. Death comes to all of us and not always easily. Keep your happy memories of his life and try not to keep the memory of his last days in the forefront of your mind. There is nothing you can do now but gently move on.

  30. QUESTION:
    Help, my cat died after four weeks of suffering from an unknown illness?
    I took Hugo (6 year old long haired cat, on my profile pic) to the vets for his booster on 30th Jan 2010. He had been off his food a bit that week but I thought it was due to the tins he sometimes goes off but apart from that seemed fine. They gave him his injection and a worming tablet and we went home. Got home and he was playing in the garden. Come tea time he was in his bed, we went out and didn’t think anything of it. Got back at midnight and he hadn’t moved, I knew something was wrong and came down in the night to check on him. The next day he clearly had a fever and was breathing fast. My friend who is a vet nurse said it could have been his booster. Rung the vets but they said “it definitely won’t be the booster”. He seemed a bit better Monday but then worse on Tuesday so I took him to vet. His temperature was 104.6!! They gave him some metacam and an antibiotic injection and sent him home. He had been off his food totally and went straight home to eat, thank goodness! The next day he seemed to be going back down hill yet again. Took him back to the vets, they kept him in on a drip and next morning he was raging to get out and came home, bright as a button! By Sunday he was quiet again, not eating much, obviously not well. Took him back to vets that week, (temperature 103.8) they kept him in and did more bloods (bloods for first week showed low white cell count and high urea but nothing major). They kept him in for three days, tested leukemia and FIV, both negative. Did more bloods second week and they were normal. Hugo didn’t respond to metacam (painkiller to reduce temperature) or the drip during the first 24 hours, he only showed improvement with steroids. By Thursday he seemed a bit better and came home but I knew he wasn’t right. I had asked about all kinds of diseases, including lymphoma, Feline peritonitis, inflamed bowel disease, all the major cat illnesses (leukemia etc.) but the vets didn’t seem to think anything seemed familiar. Female vet said, “he’s not losing enough weight for anything serious”. I asked for an Xray and ultrasound scan but they said it wasn’t necessary. Went back in on Saturday for another steroid injection. By following Friday he was the same, went back again and they gave him methodone, I was beside myself at this point. They said that they thought his kidneys were swollen but kidney function on bloods were normal. He was eating little bits but not much, he had gone from 3.82kg to 3.61kg. I went home that weekend and nursed him all I could, I let him sleep with me in the spare room, I knew he was seriously unwell. Monday morning came and I was back at the vets with him, asking them to take him in on the drip as I knew this had helped before. They were suspecting pancreatitis. Tests done for this and more bloods showed negative for pancreatitis and some deterioration in the kidneys function. I was begging for a scan, they just kept shooting me down and saying a scan wouldn’t show anything. On Wednesday afternoon female vet rang me and said that they wanted to operate, despite not doing the scan that I had requested so many times. I agreed to it but when I went to the vets that night to see my darling Hugo they had been arguing about whether to operate and the male partner in the vets over ruled the female as we were then waiting for pancreatitis test to come back. Test came back negative on 25th Feb so they were planning on operating on 26th Feb to see if they could see anything. When I got there that Thursday evening to see my soulmate Hugo he was in severe pain, could hardly breath and it broke my heart to see him like that. They gave him more methadone to ease the pain which it did. He had another session of difficulty breathing at 10.30pm that evening, they managed to settle him with oxygen and methadone but he died as he yelled out in pain at 11.00pm. I am totally devasted. R.I.P. Hugo, my best friend, I miss you dearly xx

    I am beating myself up about this, I took him to a trusted vet, did all the research I could, took advice whilst Hugo was in hospital from two other vets. Everyone seemed to draw a blank. All I know is that I was desperate for that scan. Could anyone tell me what they think Hugo could have died from? If I could have done anything different and more importantly what the vets should have done to help him? I feel the vets have let him down terribly :-(

    Any help offering is much appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      first of all, stop beating yourself up. You trusted a medical professional, which is what you are supposed to do.

      As to WHY this happened? I have no idea. Could it have been the booster – absolutely. Is it likely, not really. Generally vaccines are incredibly safe, but could your cat be the one in the million that had a bad reaction yes. Just as you could win the lotto.

      Could it be a horrible co-incidence? yes. You did mention the cat was off his food before going in for his vaccines. I am a little surprised the vet gave the vaccine to a cat that wasn’t feeling well – but maybe you didn’t tell him as you weren’t that concerned as your cat did occasionally go off his food.

      steroids suppresses the immune system, which is why your kitty was feeling better after each steroid shot.

      I do not know what went on with your cat. But a kitty with a fever of unknown origin and negative test results for everything that can be thought off is suspcious for FIP. FIP can not be cured. It can only be properly diagnosed during a necropsy after the kitty has died.

      I am very sorry you had to go through this. The ONLY hindsight I could offer you would be to take the kitty to a completely different clinic for a second opinion. I can’t tell you that it would have changed anything, but it might have made you feel a little better knowing you got a fifth or sixth opinion.

  31. QUESTION:
    FLUTD – My cat’s urinating blood?
    I have two cats; calico females age 8, sisters from the same litter. Strictly dry food diet, one litter box – automated scooping with crystals.

    Three weeks ago I noticed odd behavior from my kitty, Snickers. She was going into the litter box more frequently with little to no urine. She didn’t seem to be in any pain or discomfort and her attitude was the same. After doing some online research and speaking with a breeder friend of mine, I started homeopathic treatment. Bought new organic high-quality dry and canned food, meat and rice based, instead of meat-meal and corn based. I also bought cranberry capsules from the health food store and made parsley infused water (boiled 1 qt water with 1 bunch parsley, strained and cooled).

    I started integrating the new dry food over the next week and immediately started feeding her canned food twice daily making it into a soup with lots of extra water and the cranberry capsules. I also force feed her the parsley infused water with a dropper 2-3 times a day. I did this for ten days and started to notice an improvement. Urinating more and less frequently.

    After the ten days of treatment, I stopped feeding her canned food and put her back on dry food only, but the new dry food. Five days after the end of treatment, her symptoms returned. So I started her back on canned food with cranberry capsules and took her to the vet on Monday to have a urinalysis completed to make sure there’s no infection or blockage. They put her on IV fluids and kept her for the day. When she came home that night, she started urinating blood and has ever since.

    The test results came back yesterday… no infection or bacteria, no crystals or blockage, but lots of blood. The doctor says it’s FLUTD Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease and it should resolve itself within 7-10 days. It’s typically caused by stress and can be treated with pain reliever until the bleeding stops. If it does not resolve itself, their next suggestion would be an x-ray to determine in there’s any stones in her bladder/kidney, which they say is not too common. They say keep the litter box clean, her environment comfortable, and monitor her urine.

    I read online that changing the diet can be beneficial as well. Most places say no dry food at all, only wet food twice a day. Encourage water intake. Reduce stress. And try antioxidant vitamins and herbs.

    I’m very concerned for her health and safety and I hate that she can’t tell me how she feels. The doctor didn’t seem to think it’s a big deal and really only recommended a pain reliever. But she doesn’t act like she’s in pain, so will it help anything?

    We’re leaving for vacation this Saturday for 7 days. My neighbor and mom will be there to check on her, but I feel horrible leaving not knowing if she’s okay and if I’m doing everything I can to help her. PLEASE any suggestions or advice would be so greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.

    • ANSWER:
      The best cure for FLUTD is water. Cats developed as as desert species, so they are designed to derive most of their liquid intake through the bodies of prey animals. This means that their thirst instinct is not well developed, so even if they do have a good source of nice fresh water, they still may not drink enough to keep them well hydrated. Dry food, as you may now understand, is deficient in one nutrient, and that one nutrient is water. To help your kitty get over her FLUTD, feeding her canned food is a good start. I know that when my boy cat had FLUTD, even buying the prescription formula foods did not do the trick 100%. What really did help, though, was feeding him high quality canned food, and mixing in some extra water into the food.

      Here is a well-researched article on the topic, be sure to scroll down, because it was posted in a threaded forum, and is longer than a single post. And some of the comments on it got interspersed with the main article. http://catfood.tribe.net/thread/8db33940-373d-4063-88e6-e57c0e1e5f29

  32. QUESTION:
    The beginning of this month I lost my cat. Hes was only 2.?
    for the past year, he had been having “bladder infections” which I had been treating with medications from my vets. but about 3 wks ago this so called bladder infection made it to where he couldn’t eat, sleep, or even stand up on his own. Soon, he began making a moaning sound like he was in pain so I just had to take him to the emergency vet clinic. the vet told me that he didn’t have a bladder infection. he told me since he was neurtered he had become blocked by a feline urinary tract disease. he told me that my original vet had mis diagnosed him for the commen bladder infection. unfortunatly, he told me that there was nothing he could possibly do for him because his kidneys were already partially or totally destroyed. he said that I had no other choice but to put him down. my question is, do you think that I should have a gotten a second opinion for my cat or should I have insisted on treating him and trying to get him better. I loved that cat and I just feel terrible.
    urinary tract disease is the same as cytitis, I researched about it because I never heard of it either.

    • ANSWER:
      I am not sure what the emergency vet was talking about. I am not sure if he believes that nuturing caused your cat’s illness, but I have never heard that anywhere.

      Male cats commonly have cystitis, which is an URI. ( bladder infection) They can become blocked and be unable to urinate. This blockage can cause the urine to back up and destroy the kidneys if not treated in time. The urine just stagnates and becomes a breeding ground for bacteria.

      There are several things that you can do to help prevent a URI in male cats. If your cat is prone to URIs, he can be placed on a special diet by Science Diet. Also, you can make sure that your cat drinks a lot of fresh water. Cats will drink more if their water is in a porcelain bowl since the water stays cooler in porcelain. Also, you can add a tsp. of organic apple cider vinegar to about a quart of water to make the urine more acidic and more inhospitable to bacteria. Some people even have sucess in getting their cats to drink cranberry juice if they begin at an early age.

      As far as a second opinion, if your cat’s URI had caused his kidneys to blow out, euthanasia was probably the best solution that you could do. Don’t feel terrible about choosing to alieve your cats pain and suffering by having him euthanized. All you could do was take the emergency vet’s advice and to second guess your decision will only cause you pain.

      I am sure you know what symptoms to look for in the future if you get another Tom cat.

      I am sorry about your loss.

  33. QUESTION:
    Any ideas of what is going on with kitty that I can bring up to vet?
    I have a 6 year old Calico who has been to the vet on and off for the past month. I just feel she isn’t healthy, however so far we can’t find anything. We have done blood work, thyroid tests and so on. I plan to bring her back to the vet tomorrow. Just want to see if anyone has any ideas. Here are her symptoms:

    Coat is not taken care of. When you pull on the coat/skin it feels dehydrated (vet showed me this).
    Eyes just look a little off.
    She has lost weight.
    She has an excessive appetite. Will eat anything put in front of her and begs as though she is a starving ally cat.
    No energy.
    VERY vocal now. Constantly is meowing at us.

    This morning she had her newest symptom;
    A wet back end. Her tail, and legs surrounding her bottom are soaked. Our maine coon we lost two years ago did this when in kidney failure. So I am a little worried.

    The only test I can think of that has not been done so far is a urinalysis. I plan to ask for one of these this week.

    I can not tell you if she is urinating more frequently as we don’t have a little box in the house. Cats have a cat door and have a litter box in the garage or go outside to use the restroom. She is one that prefers not using the litter box and having the great outdoors to do her business.

    If anyone has any ideas on what this might be I would appreciate it. Three things the vet has ruled out that were common signs of her illness were : Feline Leukemia (not cancer though), diabetes, and thyroid disease. We have also treated her for any type of worm. I believe the blood work we did was the one of the cheaper end the last time we did it.

    Thank you in advance.
    Yes she is spayed and her feline leukemia test was negative.
    Also, her back end where it is wet, is still wet. It stays wet. She appears to clean it, but the area stays soaked looking. I had a cat with this two years ago and it was when she was in full liver failure. She was throwing up too. This kitty is not throwing up.

    • ANSWER:
      I strongly agree about the urinalysis too as cats are prone to urinary tract infections and this should be ruled out as it is common in cats. Kidney function tests are also done with blood work so you should ask if these tests were done as well. As for the wet back end I dont know what would cause that unless your cat likes to sit in the tub. Did it smell like urine? My cat has this thing about sitting on the wet bathmat in the tub after we shower and it does make her back end all wet but that is the only thing I can think of there. Has she been tested for feline aids? Outdoor cats can be exposed through other cats. Or, perhaps cancer of some kind but you would need to ask your vet about tests for that. Hope she is ok.

  34. QUESTION:
    How do I cope with the sudden decision to euthanize our family cat?
    Last Friday night I was visiting my parent’s house and noticed one of our family pets, a 10 year old cat, seemed very lethargic. While I was at work the next morning, my dad took him to the vet and found out he had Feline AIDS, Leukemia and kidney failure. He spent the next four days at the animal hospital being treated. Today the vet called and said there had been no signs of improvement after running the tests. My dad told the vet to go ahead and put him to sleep.

    I never had a chance to say goodbye and am now feeling extreme guilt that his life was ended too soon. The past few days I have been doing a lot of research online and I know the diseases were fatal, but I had read about many cases where the health could be managed to where the cat still had a good quality of life.

    I also feel extremely guilty that no one was there with him or to say goodbye to him. I feel like he was probably confused at why he was taken there Saturday and then never saw another familiar face before he passed. If I had known they planned to put him to sleep, I would have gone to see him before it was time.

    I just feel like this all came about so suddenly and I can’t help but thinking a hasty decision was made. I know my dad would have taken the advice of the vet, but I still can’t believe he made this decision and did not tell me until it was too late to see him.

    How do I get over the feeling of guilt that we didn’t try enough options to help him? How do I cope with feelings of guilt about never telling him how much we loved him and not being able to tell him goodbye and be there with him before he passed?
    I know my dad did what he thought was best, I just wish I could have said goodbye. We have had other family pets that we have spent a lot of time and money taking care of in their old age. We are not a family to give up on our pets, which is why I think I feel so guilty. With the other pets we really tried to help them. I just can’t help but feeling we didn’t help him enough.

    • ANSWER:

  35. QUESTION:
    FLUTD cat food recommendations / options? any VETS? people with long time experience? (long question)?
    one of my cats has FLUTD. my vet told me (and has repeatedly told me) that the only food they recommend feeding him at all is Hills PRESCRIPTION (not science) Diet Feline c/d dry food, which can only be purchased at a veterinary clinic, because it lowers the pH of his urine because of its low magnesium.

    I’ve read elsewhere and have been told by other people (not veterinarians though) many different things including:

    1. that dry food contributes to the problem by removing hydration from the cats sytem?
    2. that Hills Prescription Diet contains mostly grains?
    3. that removing magnesium from foods is not the best solution, as cats may need some magnesium?

    my concern is that if any of the things people are telling me are correct, and I’m buying food vets get paid to sell, I could be shortening his lifespan when my intention is to keep him alive and happy as long as possible.

    he’s eaten Prescription c/d for at least 4 years and has had no health problems while on it, after almost dying from crystal blockage and barely avoiding kidney damage from eating Purina Cat Chow (not saying Purina is dangerous, my cat has a disease). I got him to resume drinking water by buying a cat fountain because he was afraid to drink, and it took a week to get him to eat the Prescription c/d for the first time. but 4 years now.

    a pet shop owner gave me samples of a few different products (but she also told me to continue buying Hills Prescription Feline c/d as she thinks it helps), some of the products being: dry Taste Of The Wild feline formula, dry Felidae, wet Wellness Healthy Indulgence packets (she had no dry Wellness). she also told me what others have: that moisure/water is the best because it can prevent the crystals from forming and the infections from coming back. she said cats are desert animals and naturally resist water, so wet food is best.

    so far my plan is: continue feeding Hills Prescription c/d, buy Wellness wet Healthy Indulgence packets to give him more liquids.

    anyone have any experience with this situation? what do you feed your cat, and how long has it worked?

    • ANSWER:
      My cat, Kiwi, developed stress-related FLUTD. He is a typical case- 3 year old adult male indoor cat, overweight about 10%.
      Vet recommended feeding any of the following: Royal Canin S/O kibbles and pouches (mine loves both), Hill’s C/D (kitty likes it, but not as much as RC), and Purina D/M cans (kitty likes these a little more than Hills).
      If you can afford feeding canned exclusively- go for it.
      If not, the only kibble I feed Kiwi now is the Royal Canin S/O; it’s formulated so neither oxalate nor struvite crystals will form. He loves it, though, so his weight-loss diet isn’t working so well…
      As for my other kitties, I feed grain free, or, rice as the only cereal grain. Wellness, California Naturals, Royal Canin Rabbit and Green Pea, Veterinarian Formulation Chicken and Rice (from Arkat in Arkansas) etc. are all favorites. I give them a variety, so any little flaw in one formulation doesn’t have the chance to cause long-term health issues. My cats range from 2 to 15 years old, and all are doing great.

  36. QUESTION:
    Are Turkish Angora Cats a Quality Cat Breed?
    My cat recently was put to sleep (feline leukemia). I was very attached, my dad has been looking at the breed turkish angora. They aren’t found in our state, Michigan. But they are in Indiana, Illinois and Ohio. I was wondering if they were a good cat breed. He said that they are ex-show cats and that they live a long time. I was wondering if they develop diseases easily and if they are easy to take care of for a 15 year old like myself. I have found that a lot of these cats are deaf is that true. The last cat I had was a siamese, he also had kidney failure. Please help me find information so I can make a good decision.

    • ANSWER:
      This rare breed is a valued treasure in the cat fancy community.
      It is a well-behaved breed.They can be taught to retrieve and perform tricks. They have a long average life span of 15 or more years.

      Trademark Traits:
      Most known for having a white, longhaired coat
      Active and playful
      Needs attention
      Loves water
      Affectionate
      A social cat
      Very graceful
      And adaptable

      Some Ideal Human Companions:
      Families with children
      Families with other pets
      Singles with other pets
      First-time cat owners
      Active households

      What They’re Like to Live With:
      Turkish Angoras are friendly, intelligent, active cats who enjoy interacting with their human family as well as with other cats. Unlike most cats, many members of this breed love to swim and are drawn to water. Turkish Angoras are chatty cats who can be very determined. They are sometimes mischievous and like to keep themselves busy. Interactive play can go a long way in helping them bond and keeping them out of trouble.

      Things You Should Know:
      Turkish Angoras with blue eyes are prone to deafness. Cats with one blue eye and one amber eye will be deaf on the side of the blue eye. Because of their long coat, Turkish Angoras need frequent brushing to prevent mats and hairballs. Turkish Angoras are active cats that need playmates and attention to stay out of trouble.

      Turkish Angora History:
      The origins of the Turkish Angora remain a mystery, although longhaired cats have been seen in parts of the Middle East for centuries. Formerly known as “Ankara Cats,” in honor of the city of Ankara in Turkey, the name for a particular strain of these longhaired felines was changed to Turkish Angora when the name of the city was changed from Ankara to Angora. Turkish Angoras and other longhaired cats where first introduced to Europe in the late 1500s. The breed came to the United States in the 1700s. Subsequent crossbreeding to other longhaired cats nearly destroyed the breed until in the 1900s, the Turkish government began a breeding program to save the all-white Angora. A pair of cats from this program were imported into the United States, and the breed experienced a resurgence. Although still somewhat rare, the Turkish Angora is growing steadily in popularity. The breed is recognized by the Cat Fanciers Association, The International Cat Association and the American Cat Fanciers Association.

      The Look of the Turkish Angora:
      Turkish Angoras are most known for being all white, with blue eyes, or one-blue and one-amber eye. The breed also comes in many other cats colors, although these colors are less common than white. The coat of the Angora is long and silky. The tail is full and brushy, and the body is long and lean.

      Sorry this is so long.

      Here are some photos

      http://www.cat-urine.net/images/breeds/Turkish_Angora_cat.jpg

      http://www.pictures-of-cats.org/images/turkish-angora-cat-7.jpg

      http://www.flickr.com/photos/delina/2943462524/

      Albino Eyes

      Jareth as a kitten

  37. QUESTION:
    ****Desperate Situation****What to do with a feral cat with feline Stomatitis who won’t eat?
    I have a feral cat that was diagnosed with feline stomatitis. This started 4 months ago when she stopped eating. I took her to the vet where he has given her a shot of Depo Medrol and and Depopan (1/2cc of each) and along with amoxicillin that I am to put into her food when she starts eating again. Usually within a 24 hour period after getting the steroids she is able to eat again. She stays pain free for about a month and then stops eating, but once she gets that injection again she is fine. I’ve been doing this with her for 4 months now and she stays pain free for a month. This last time, being the fourth time she stopped eating again and the shot only kept her pain free for about 11 days (took her to the vet Dec.1st and by Dec 12th she stopped eating). So again I took her back he gave her another shot and gave me Prednisone liquid to put in her food on the 9th or 10th day.. Well the next day after her injection she ate half a can of moist canned food and now it’s the day after that and she won’t eat at all again. Is she now immune to the steroids? Can anyone suggest what I can do to help her. She is a feral cat so i cannot give her anything orally at all, she will bite or scratch me. I can only put it in her food and now she won’t eat. HELP!!!! Also she won’t drink any liquids at all since this problem started 4 months ago. Are there foods out there that she would absolutely be attracted to to eat? I’ve tried baby food, sardines, tuna fish, yogurt I even put the fish in a blender with water for a smooth consistency, but nothing works, she won’t eat any of these things. I’m really concerned because she gets the water she needs only from the food she eats and if she is not eating that will affect her kidneys. If anyone can please help me at all I would appreciate it. Also, I’ve contacted the vet and I’m waiting for a phone call back. If anyone knows of any questions I should ask him, that would be great. I’ve looked up this disease on Google and everyone is suggesting tooth extraction. If that was the answer would it be a full tooth extraction or partial? All I know is that her condition is severe. Thanks to all who can help me..

    • ANSWER:


Feline Diets For Kidney Disease

Kidney stones can be a very painful condition. There are several different methods used to eliminate the them. Among some of the more popular methods is herbal treatments, pain medications with a combination of increasing fluids and dietary modifications.

However, sometimes it is necessary to use more invasive procedures to eliminate the kidney stone in the event it is unable to be passed through other methods. Laser kidney stone removal is one of the more extreme means for assisting in the removal.

For many, just the thought of having any type of surgical procedure done causes them to cringe. However, you might not realize it, but the laser kidney removal process is definitely a lot less painful than dealing with the stomes themselves. The Uteroscopic stone removal is a fairly simple procedure that is going to require you to go under a general anesthetic.
The procedure consists of a surgeon using a uteroscop (small fiber optic utensil) that is inserted through the urethra into the bladder and finally it is inserted into the ureter. Usually in a fairly minimal amount of time the kidney stone is found. Once it is found there will be a shock wave that destroys the kidney stone so it can be either eliminated or passed through urine or removed by another tool during the procedure.

Typically, after the procedure has been completed a portion of the tube that was inserted is left behind. The stent it left so it can induce the body to begin the healing process. Generally, when the stent is left in the body it is because the kidney stone was likely in either the lower or middle portion of the ureter.

Laser removal is virtually painless as the small medical instrument is gently inserted. The procedure begins with the urethra and makes it way into the ureter, which is where the stone should be. You can expect to be given a local anesthetic for this procedure.

Recovery time is minimal, although you will not be able to drive after the procedure due to the anesthesia. The kidney stone is then targeted with the laser and is removed through urine after the procedure. It will either disintegrate upon contact from the laser or it will break down into smaller pieces where it will be passed in the urine.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of Feline diabetes or kidney failure? I am worried about my kitty?
    I am going to call and see if the vet can get me in tomorrow, but here is what has gone on so far:
    My cat is is a 10 year old Manx. He has always been small but the last few weeks he is practically skeletal, I can feel every bone in his spine and hips. I weighed him yesterday and he was 7.5 lbs. He is an indoor/outdoor cat, and at first I thought it was just worms so I gave him a de-wormer about 1 1/2 weeks ago, and another follow up pill yesterday. It was “Drontal Plus”. He seems to be in really good spirits, and is acting practically normal, although I don’t usually see him as often as I do now because I am keeping him indoors for now. He is still playing, and cuddling. He doesn’t seem to be eating much at all, so I got him some a/d® Canine/Feline science diet food, which is a high calorie supplement. He ate about 1/2 can of that today. I have been reading a lot of scary things on the internet about diabetes and kidney disease, and it seems like he is drinking more water than normal. Do you think he could be drinking more because of the de-wormer, or is it a high possibility that he has a serious disease? Would he be acting normal if he did? He is up to date on all of his shots. I realize that I probably will not get a proper diagnosis on yahoo Answers, but what do you guys think?
    He turned out to be diabetic :(

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, drinking a lot and urinating a lot are symptoms of both. and yes at first it might be possible that they otherwise seem normal. That’s why it is good you are getting your cat buddy into the vet tomorrow.
      With kidney disease another common thing would be vomiting, maybe vomiting sort of clear or foamy fluid. also loss of appetite and thus weight loss.

      With diabetes, past a certain point, there is increase in appetite but even if they eat more. they lose weight . The coat gets dry and dandruffy. and then they might start getting weak in their legs. (from neuropathy — that is often reversible)

      If it’s diabetes it is very treatable, in fact many cats who are treated soon and get their blood sugar under control are able to go into remission and just be diet controlled. others only need a diet change to start with and that controls it.
      Even kidney disease seems to have come a long way and many cats are living years with it.

      Hang on to the following links.
      if he has diabetes check outhttp://felinediabetes.com/ , they have a lot of info on there and connected with the site is a very very active message board FDMB http://www.felinediabetes.com/FDMB/

      If it turns out to be kidney disease….There are 2 great sites that have been around a long time with tons of info. one is US one is UK so there is some country specific info but most applies to all cats

      http://www.felinecrf.com

      and http://www.felinecrf.org
      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-CRF-Support/ yahoo discussion list for people whose cats have kidney disease. You will probably find a lot of support and tips there.

  2. QUESTION:
    I need help understanding/interpreting feline blood test results. No guessing please.?
    I took my 13 yr old cat to the vet last week because she is having labored breathing. She seems fine, not distressed, eating fine but her breathing sounds bad and her sides retract each time she breathes. She was breathing very quick shallow breaths. The vet said it was asthma but wanted to do xrays and blood tests to be sure. Her blood test results were as follows:

    Test Result Reference Range Indicator
    ALB = 3.1 g/dL 2.3-3.9 Normal
    ALKP = 36 U/L 14-111 Normal
    ALT < 10U/L 12-130 No graph shown
    AMYL = 573 U/L 500-1500 Normal (at the low end of normal)
    BUN = 16 mg/dL 16-36 Low (on the line for low/normal, vet says Low)
    Ca = 9.1 mg/dL 7.8-11.3 Normal
    CHOL = 126 mg/dL 65-225 Normal
    CREA = 2.3 mg/dL 0.8-2.4 High? (inside the "normal" box but towards high end,
    vet says "High")
    GLOB = 3.7 g/dL 2.8-5.1 Normal
    GLU = 155 mg/dL 71-159 High (line between normal/high, vet says not a
    concern, it's just high because she's scared
    or nervous)
    PHOS = 5.1 mg/dL 3.1-7.5 Normal
    TBIL < 0.1 mg/dL 0.0-0.9 No graph shown
    TP = 6.8 g/dL 5.7-8.9 Normal

    HCT = 37.9% 24.0-45.0 Normal
    HGB = 11.5 g/dL 8.0-15.0 Normal
    MCHC = 30.3 g/dL 30.0-36.9 Low (line between low/normal)
    WBC = 25.2 x10^9/L 5.0-18.9 High
    GRANS = 22.0 x10^9/L 2.5-12.5 High
    %GRANS =87%
    L/M =3.2 x10^9/L 1.5-7.8 Normal
    %L/M = 13%
    PLT = 46 x10^9/L 175-500 Low
    Retics ~ 0.6%

    Her vet said she has CRF/kidney disease and told me to start her on Hill's Prescription Diet or if she wouldn't eat that (said a lot of cats won't) a recipe she gave me that consisted of liver, calcium carbonate, eggs and vegetable oil immediately. She said based on her creatinine levels my cat was in the 3rd of 4 stages and her kidneys would fail quickly if I continued with her current diet. She made it clear that I needed to start feeding her the new diet immediately. My cat won't eat it, any of it. She's always been a very picky eater. I went back and asked for a can of the prescription food, the vet tech sold me a can of a/d critical care formula, she ate this. I went back to get more and the vet said it was not good for her kidneys :^/ That she has to eat the k/d formula. I bought this and she won't touch it. I even tried adding tuna juice and she won't touch it.

    While researching what else she can eat, I noticed that her blood test results don't seem to be consistent with CRF test results. ie: her BUN is low/normal not high, HCT is normal, PHOS is normal

    I am wondering if anyone that knows veterinary medicine can answer this for me. I'm extremely concerned because she was eating fine before the diet change even with the labored breathing, now she won't eat any of the k/d foods and not more than a bite or two of anything else. The vet says if she won't eat the kidney diet to add water and force feed it to her from a squeeze bottle. This seems counterproductive (and painful for me, she doesn't like being force-anything) if she isn't in kidney failure. If she is, then I would really appreciate suggestions on alternatives to the aforementioned k/d food (tried can and dry) and the k/d liver recipe that she won't eat.

    She has had antibiotic and steroid shots for the lung infection. Plus the vet prescribed liquid antibiotics and probiotic paste to take home. My cat would let me give her the antibiotics to begin with because she didn't have much "fight" in her. Now she has it back and is fighting me when I give her the antibiotic. She won't touch the probiotic or any food that I put it in, even tuna (the bribe food/her fave). I've also been putting her in a crate and giving her albuterol nebulizer treatments followed by percussions. Her breathing is better than it was. But her respirations while laying down/resting are 55-60 breaths per minute.
    Vet did xrays because she felt "lumps" in her hind legs. Turned out to be nothing. The xrays did show "something" in her lungs (two hazy spots, one at the top edge of right lung and one on the towards the edge of the left lung) but the doctor said with her age she doesn't recommend surgery to find out if it is something "bad" or not. Just do antibiotics/nebs/percussions
    JC: Thank you so much for your reply. I appreciate you taking the time to read my entire question and to give an informed answer. She is family. I've had her since she was a tiny kitten and she means the world to me. My gut told me that something wasn't right with her diagnosis. Especially when she was looking at the xrays. She went up to the light board and stared at it, then moved really close and stared again for a bit and then said "there's something here..and here" pointing at the very light hazy spots but didn't tell me what that meant until I asked for more information. So, no, she did not send them to a radiologist. I had taken her in because of the breathing and she also had a hard spot under one of her nipples. We got a dog last year, so for the past year she doesn't live in my lap like she always has. Needless to say, when I was holding her, I felt the "tough" spot on her tummy/under the nipple. The vet seemed somewhat unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that
    unconcerned about the spot but said from feeling it that it was a "mammary tumor" which seems like something to be concerned about. She said if it gets any bigger to bring her back, but that was that. Velvet has always been a very healthy fiesty girl (she's a Russian Blue) but in the last couple of years she developed a small lump over her front right shoulder, it looks/feels like fluid filled skin, I was told by everyone this is nothing to be concerned about especially since it doesn't hurt her in the least to touch it, press it, etc. The vet said it wasn't anything to worry about either, just due to her getting older. She did say that because of the lumps in her legs and the hard spot in her tummy we should do xrays to make sure it wasn't a tumor in her lungs causing the breathing problems. I asked about the legs, because she didn't even mention them when reviewing the xray. She said "it's nothing, if it was, I would have told you".

    I was terrified when I went in. She seems to have

    • ANSWER:
      Time to find a new vet.

      Those aren’t the kidney numbers of a CRF cat. A better predictor of kidney health is to test the specific gravity of the urine – if it’s concentrated, the kidneys are functioning properly, if it’s too dilute, they are starting to age. The reduced kidney function is one of aging, and not a disease. A cat’s body craves and needs protein – that is why she is instinctively rejecting the K/D. Very few vets will prescribe a low-protein diet for cats with aging kidneys – they 1) won’t eat it 2) it leads to muscle wasting (the body needs to get protein from somewhere!) and 3) it hasn’t been proven that low-protein slows down the progression of the CRF. What she needs is to eat – a high quality canned food free of by-products and chemical preservatives. That’s what my vet recommends, based on the latest research. The by-products are hard to digest, and the chemicals are tough on the kidneys. Good canned foods will keep her better hydrated, and slow down the aging of the kidneys.

      Did the vet send the xrays out for a ‘real’ radiologist to interpret? Cats with asthma – untreated – can get hard spots in their lungs, and those will show up on xrays. It takes a real radiologist to interpret an xray – the answer is NOT surgery to find out what it is, it’s to have a qualified person read and interpret the xray. Personal story – my rescue rex was coughing prior to his coming to me, and was taken to the vet who did a chest xray, and diagnosed severe hear disease and wanted to do ultrasounds, etc. I insisted that the xrays were to be sent to a radiologist – diagnosis was asthma. Quite a bit different than the vet’s diagnosis of an aorta ready to self destruct.

      CRF is not a death sentence. And yours isn’t there yet. Feeding her a food she can’t stand is counterproductive, and can lead to liver failure when she refuses to eat. Find another vet, and feed her a quality canned food so that the poor thing eats! At 13 – with that pretty good bloodwork – she should have some good quality years left to spend with you.

  3. QUESTION:
    BARF diet for Cats…anyone?
    I have a male adult cat who has been troubled by a horrible illness called Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) I was told by the vet he’d end up with cancer in the colon. Yes, he had chronic colitis, a problem in the large intestine which was causing my pet bleed through the rectum and horrible, nonstop diarrhea. My kitty was getting weary of his suffering and I was getting so, so tired of throwing away bed sheets, cleaning after him every day sometimes 2 times a day. I could not sleep well just thinking of what else I could have possibly found dirty in the house. He never went outside the box, but all that blood, with colon mucose coming out he could not control. My cat got to a point where he could not sit down comfortably, and there was bloody diarrhea in his tail, kitchen counter, tables, furniture etc ALL THE TIME.

    I did not want to watch my cat give up and not do anything, so I did some research and finally switched him to a species appropriate diet: cooked or raw meat with bones, organs and probiotics and digestive enzymes. I now am keeping all my cats on the BARF diet, always making sure I get fresh food from animals which were not cured or injected with substances to keep the meat fresh. I also make sure to keep the phosphorus-calcium ratio right, and it’s been a year now since I have not seen signs of IBD. My cat’s stools are formed and healthy. My vet says my cat looks incredibly fine.

    So, I just wanted to see how many follow this diet and what you think of it. I am aware of the risks, like toxoplasmosis, but my cat was dying in front of my eyes on Science Diet, Purina, Iams, Prescription foods like Hill’s z/d etc, and many, many more expensive commercial foods and not one helped my poor feline. He was on antibiotics and prednisone all the time and nothing ever worked! So, I learned that cats are obligate carnivores and need to eat other animals to live a better life. I have noticed too many cases of IBD, Diabetes, Obesity, UTI, Kidney Disease, and cancer, all because we’re feeding species inappropriate foods to our precious pets. The number of sick ones keeps increasing, and we are responsible.

    Anyone trying out this diet? I’d love to hear some of your experiences.
    If anyone is interested, this website I’m about to provide is one of the best and I am a client of them. I encourage everybody to take a look. Their service is high quality. Thank you ladies!

    www.hare-today.com

    • ANSWER:
      When I first was investigating the raw diets I was on groups where people reported that many cats would be “cured” of IBD within 48 hours. I have had no experience of that with my cats so I’m happy to hear another testimonial to the efficacy of a raw meat diet for cat health.

      I too only do a 50% raw diet. Right now I am down to my last frozen “muffin” of raw chicken. No hearts at the store today. When I called the market where I get my turkey parts last week they had just cleaned out the turkeys and thrown away the hearts and livers to use with the turkey.

      Also, having acquired two kittens this summer I am going through the raw meat mixture at double the speed I am used to.

      I do think the diet has extraordinary benefits for cat health.

  4. QUESTION:
    FLUTD cat food recommendations / options? any VETS? people with long time experience? (long question)?
    one of my cats has FLUTD. my vet told me (and has repeatedly told me) that the only food they recommend feeding him at all is Hills PRESCRIPTION (not science) Diet Feline c/d dry food, which can only be purchased at a veterinary clinic, because it lowers the pH of his urine because of its low magnesium.

    I’ve read elsewhere and have been told by other people (not veterinarians though) many different things including:

    1. that dry food contributes to the problem by removing hydration from the cats sytem?
    2. that Hills Prescription Diet contains mostly grains?
    3. that removing magnesium from foods is not the best solution, as cats may need some magnesium?

    my concern is that if any of the things people are telling me are correct, and I’m buying food vets get paid to sell, I could be shortening his lifespan when my intention is to keep him alive and happy as long as possible.

    he’s eaten Prescription c/d for at least 4 years and has had no health problems while on it, after almost dying from crystal blockage and barely avoiding kidney damage from eating Purina Cat Chow (not saying Purina is dangerous, my cat has a disease). I got him to resume drinking water by buying a cat fountain because he was afraid to drink, and it took a week to get him to eat the Prescription c/d for the first time. but 4 years now.

    a pet shop owner gave me samples of a few different products (but she also told me to continue buying Hills Prescription Feline c/d as she thinks it helps), some of the products being: dry Taste Of The Wild feline formula, dry Felidae, wet Wellness Healthy Indulgence packets (she had no dry Wellness). she also told me what others have: that moisure/water is the best because it can prevent the crystals from forming and the infections from coming back. she said cats are desert animals and naturally resist water, so wet food is best.

    so far my plan is: continue feeding Hills Prescription c/d, buy Wellness wet Healthy Indulgence packets to give him more liquids.

    anyone have any experience with this situation? what do you feed your cat, and how long has it worked?

    • ANSWER:
      My cat, Kiwi, developed stress-related FLUTD. He is a typical case- 3 year old adult male indoor cat, overweight about 10%.
      Vet recommended feeding any of the following: Royal Canin S/O kibbles and pouches (mine loves both), Hill’s C/D (kitty likes it, but not as much as RC), and Purina D/M cans (kitty likes these a little more than Hills).
      If you can afford feeding canned exclusively- go for it.
      If not, the only kibble I feed Kiwi now is the Royal Canin S/O; it’s formulated so neither oxalate nor struvite crystals will form. He loves it, though, so his weight-loss diet isn’t working so well…
      As for my other kitties, I feed grain free, or, rice as the only cereal grain. Wellness, California Naturals, Royal Canin Rabbit and Green Pea, Veterinarian Formulation Chicken and Rice (from Arkat in Arkansas) etc. are all favorites. I give them a variety, so any little flaw in one formulation doesn’t have the chance to cause long-term health issues. My cats range from 2 to 15 years old, and all are doing great.

  5. QUESTION:
    FLUTD – My cat’s urinating blood?
    I have two cats; calico females age 8, sisters from the same litter. Strictly dry food diet, one litter box – automated scooping with crystals.

    Three weeks ago I noticed odd behavior from my kitty, Snickers. She was going into the litter box more frequently with little to no urine. She didn’t seem to be in any pain or discomfort and her attitude was the same. After doing some online research and speaking with a breeder friend of mine, I started homeopathic treatment. Bought new organic high-quality dry and canned food, meat and rice based, instead of meat-meal and corn based. I also bought cranberry capsules from the health food store and made parsley infused water (boiled 1 qt water with 1 bunch parsley, strained and cooled).

    I started integrating the new dry food over the next week and immediately started feeding her canned food twice daily making it into a soup with lots of extra water and the cranberry capsules. I also force feed her the parsley infused water with a dropper 2-3 times a day. I did this for ten days and started to notice an improvement. Urinating more and less frequently.

    After the ten days of treatment, I stopped feeding her canned food and put her back on dry food only, but the new dry food. Five days after the end of treatment, her symptoms returned. So I started her back on canned food with cranberry capsules and took her to the vet on Monday to have a urinalysis completed to make sure there’s no infection or blockage. They put her on IV fluids and kept her for the day. When she came home that night, she started urinating blood and has ever since.

    The test results came back yesterday… no infection or bacteria, no crystals or blockage, but lots of blood. The doctor says it’s FLUTD Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease and it should resolve itself within 7-10 days. It’s typically caused by stress and can be treated with pain reliever until the bleeding stops. If it does not resolve itself, their next suggestion would be an x-ray to determine in there’s any stones in her bladder/kidney, which they say is not too common. They say keep the litter box clean, her environment comfortable, and monitor her urine.

    I read online that changing the diet can be beneficial as well. Most places say no dry food at all, only wet food twice a day. Encourage water intake. Reduce stress. And try antioxidant vitamins and herbs.

    I’m very concerned for her health and safety and I hate that she can’t tell me how she feels. The doctor didn’t seem to think it’s a big deal and really only recommended a pain reliever. But she doesn’t act like she’s in pain, so will it help anything?

    We’re leaving for vacation this Saturday for 7 days. My neighbor and mom will be there to check on her, but I feel horrible leaving not knowing if she’s okay and if I’m doing everything I can to help her. PLEASE any suggestions or advice would be so greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.

    • ANSWER:
      The best cure for FLUTD is water. Cats developed as as desert species, so they are designed to derive most of their liquid intake through the bodies of prey animals. This means that their thirst instinct is not well developed, so even if they do have a good source of nice fresh water, they still may not drink enough to keep them well hydrated. Dry food, as you may now understand, is deficient in one nutrient, and that one nutrient is water. To help your kitty get over her FLUTD, feeding her canned food is a good start. I know that when my boy cat had FLUTD, even buying the prescription formula foods did not do the trick 100%. What really did help, though, was feeding him high quality canned food, and mixing in some extra water into the food.

      Here is a well-researched article on the topic, be sure to scroll down, because it was posted in a threaded forum, and is longer than a single post. And some of the comments on it got interspersed with the main article. http://catfood.tribe.net/thread/8db33940-373d-4063-88e6-e57c0e1e5f29


Feline Diet For Kidney Problems

Occasional incidents of feline vomiting is usually nothing to worry about if your cat otherwise appears healthy. Mild conditions can cause your cat to vomit, but it can also be a symptom of a more serious disease. Some of the common causes include parasites, hairballs, and infections. Let’s take a look at some of these causes of feline vomiting.

Parasites

The first main cause of vomiting is an infestation of parasites. There are various species of worms that can live in your cat’s stomach or small intestine. You may be able to see them in your cat’s feces or vomit. It’s best to get your cat on deworming medication as soon as possible as an infestation can open your cat to other complications.
Hairballs

Hairballs are also a common cause of feline vomiting. They form as a result of ingested hair that your cat swallows while grooming. Although hairballs can be a problem with all cats, those with long hair develop them most often. To prevent them from forming, you could give your cat more fiber in his diet and groom him yourself on a daily basis.

Infections

The next reason your cat could be vomiting is because he has a viral infection. These viruses can affect the stomach or part of t he intestinal tract. It is also common for your cat to have diarrhea also. Most viral infections will go away after a few days when the body’s defenses kick in.

Diet

Your cat’s particular diet can also cause him to vomit. Various things like garbage, chocolate, or onions can also cause feline vomiting. Poisonous chemicals such as antifreeze can also be to blame. You should also make sure that your cat doesn’t ingest human medications. Your cat may also be simply eating his food too fast. This can be a problem in a multi-cat household where one cat fears another will eat his food.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Treating kidney stones in cats: Medicated food?
    Hello-
    My cat Tut has recently be diagnosed with kidney stones. The vet prescribed us some special dissolutionary cat food (Royal Canin Urinary SO canned cat food) to help manage/dissolve the stones… The only problem is he refuses to eat it! He will go on a hunger strike and lose weight if it’s all I feed him. His old diet will only worsen the stones, so now I’m stuck.

    My question is: does anyone know of a different kind/brand of cat food that works for dissolving kidney stones? I ordered some royal canin dry food to try soon. NOTE: they are NOT bladder stones.

    Or has anyone had experience with herbal remedies for feline kidney stones? I’m just looking for any options at this point. Thank you in advance.

    P.S. I’ve tried to make the current medicated food enticing by heating it up, mashing it, mixing it with water, all to no avail.

    • ANSWER:
      You are seeing one of the most difficult and frustrating things when your cat needs to be on a specific diet. The Royal Canin works for both struvite and oxalate crystals that can form. If only struvite treatment becomes much easier, since acidification works. But oxalate crystals are not soluble in water, nor can they be made soluble, so dietary approaches are required. And many cats form both types of crystals.

      You can ask your vet about Hills feline c/d or Purina UR St/Ox. And there may be others specially formulated. Encouraging your cat to drink more is also useful, and often a fountain will do that.

      For kidney stones versus bladder stones, see the link for more amplification of types of stones.

  2. QUESTION:
    BARF diet for Cats…anyone?
    I have a male adult cat who has been troubled by a horrible illness called Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) I was told by the vet he’d end up with cancer in the colon. Yes, he had chronic colitis, a problem in the large intestine which was causing my pet bleed through the rectum and horrible, nonstop diarrhea. My kitty was getting weary of his suffering and I was getting so, so tired of throwing away bed sheets, cleaning after him every day sometimes 2 times a day. I could not sleep well just thinking of what else I could have possibly found dirty in the house. He never went outside the box, but all that blood, with colon mucose coming out he could not control. My cat got to a point where he could not sit down comfortably, and there was bloody diarrhea in his tail, kitchen counter, tables, furniture etc ALL THE TIME.

    I did not want to watch my cat give up and not do anything, so I did some research and finally switched him to a species appropriate diet: cooked or raw meat with bones, organs and probiotics and digestive enzymes. I now am keeping all my cats on the BARF diet, always making sure I get fresh food from animals which were not cured or injected with substances to keep the meat fresh. I also make sure to keep the phosphorus-calcium ratio right, and it’s been a year now since I have not seen signs of IBD. My cat’s stools are formed and healthy. My vet says my cat looks incredibly fine.

    So, I just wanted to see how many follow this diet and what you think of it. I am aware of the risks, like toxoplasmosis, but my cat was dying in front of my eyes on Science Diet, Purina, Iams, Prescription foods like Hill’s z/d etc, and many, many more expensive commercial foods and not one helped my poor feline. He was on antibiotics and prednisone all the time and nothing ever worked! So, I learned that cats are obligate carnivores and need to eat other animals to live a better life. I have noticed too many cases of IBD, Diabetes, Obesity, UTI, Kidney Disease, and cancer, all because we’re feeding species inappropriate foods to our precious pets. The number of sick ones keeps increasing, and we are responsible.

    Anyone trying out this diet? I’d love to hear some of your experiences.
    If anyone is interested, this website I’m about to provide is one of the best and I am a client of them. I encourage everybody to take a look. Their service is high quality. Thank you ladies!

    www.hare-today.com

    • ANSWER:
      When I first was investigating the raw diets I was on groups where people reported that many cats would be “cured” of IBD within 48 hours. I have had no experience of that with my cats so I’m happy to hear another testimonial to the efficacy of a raw meat diet for cat health.

      I too only do a 50% raw diet. Right now I am down to my last frozen “muffin” of raw chicken. No hearts at the store today. When I called the market where I get my turkey parts last week they had just cleaned out the turkeys and thrown away the hearts and livers to use with the turkey.

      Also, having acquired two kittens this summer I am going through the raw meat mixture at double the speed I am used to.

      I do think the diet has extraordinary benefits for cat health.

  3. QUESTION:
    FLUTD cat food recommendations / options? any VETS? people with long time experience? (long question)?
    one of my cats has FLUTD. my vet told me (and has repeatedly told me) that the only food they recommend feeding him at all is Hills PRESCRIPTION (not science) Diet Feline c/d dry food, which can only be purchased at a veterinary clinic, because it lowers the pH of his urine because of its low magnesium.

    I’ve read elsewhere and have been told by other people (not veterinarians though) many different things including:

    1. that dry food contributes to the problem by removing hydration from the cats sytem?
    2. that Hills Prescription Diet contains mostly grains?
    3. that removing magnesium from foods is not the best solution, as cats may need some magnesium?

    my concern is that if any of the things people are telling me are correct, and I’m buying food vets get paid to sell, I could be shortening his lifespan when my intention is to keep him alive and happy as long as possible.

    he’s eaten Prescription c/d for at least 4 years and has had no health problems while on it, after almost dying from crystal blockage and barely avoiding kidney damage from eating Purina Cat Chow (not saying Purina is dangerous, my cat has a disease). I got him to resume drinking water by buying a cat fountain because he was afraid to drink, and it took a week to get him to eat the Prescription c/d for the first time. but 4 years now.

    a pet shop owner gave me samples of a few different products (but she also told me to continue buying Hills Prescription Feline c/d as she thinks it helps), some of the products being: dry Taste Of The Wild feline formula, dry Felidae, wet Wellness Healthy Indulgence packets (she had no dry Wellness). she also told me what others have: that moisure/water is the best because it can prevent the crystals from forming and the infections from coming back. she said cats are desert animals and naturally resist water, so wet food is best.

    so far my plan is: continue feeding Hills Prescription c/d, buy Wellness wet Healthy Indulgence packets to give him more liquids.

    anyone have any experience with this situation? what do you feed your cat, and how long has it worked?

    • ANSWER:
      My cat, Kiwi, developed stress-related FLUTD. He is a typical case- 3 year old adult male indoor cat, overweight about 10%.
      Vet recommended feeding any of the following: Royal Canin S/O kibbles and pouches (mine loves both), Hill’s C/D (kitty likes it, but not as much as RC), and Purina D/M cans (kitty likes these a little more than Hills).
      If you can afford feeding canned exclusively- go for it.
      If not, the only kibble I feed Kiwi now is the Royal Canin S/O; it’s formulated so neither oxalate nor struvite crystals will form. He loves it, though, so his weight-loss diet isn’t working so well…
      As for my other kitties, I feed grain free, or, rice as the only cereal grain. Wellness, California Naturals, Royal Canin Rabbit and Green Pea, Veterinarian Formulation Chicken and Rice (from Arkat in Arkansas) etc. are all favorites. I give them a variety, so any little flaw in one formulation doesn’t have the chance to cause long-term health issues. My cats range from 2 to 15 years old, and all are doing great.

  4. QUESTION:
    Suggestions for a geriatric cat with notable difficulty in chewing, drinking? Any veterinarians out there?
    She is a 19-year old spayed female American shorthair, still remarkably active, even though last year’s metabolic panel suggested that she is experiencing some renal distress. I’ve tried to modify her diet accordingly, but she seems to have difficulty masticating, and won’t eat kibble at all. She has always been very slender, but is now so thin…practically emaciated… that I feed her whatever she is willing to eat, just to get the calories into her. Her appetite has not been an issue; I believe that the weight loss has been largely due to some metabolic or other systemic problem, but for the record, her bloodwork has not indicated any thyroid dysfunction, nor is she diabetic. She is pretty elderly, as cats go, of course, and over the last year or two, there have been episodes where I thought that she was succumbing to the inevitable kidney failure (dark then bloody urine, lethargy, malaise) but each time she has rebounded, and even now, as thin as she is (probably under 3 pounds), she remains vigorous and playful, her eyes are bright and clear, and she is clearly not in other distress. BUT: She seems to have difficulty drinking, preferring to lap water from the dripping faucet in the kitchen, which is fine by me, but even then, she frequently “pops” her mouth open, distends her tongue, cocking her head this way and that…and just appears as if she is somehow confused about how to proceed. When eating (canned pate’ type food), she pauses occasionally, performing the same actions, but in this case, the popping noise seems to be accompanied by a “grinding” component as well…it is difficult to distinguish, but darned if it doesn’t sound like cases of TMJ that I’ve heard before (in humans). It might be coming from the mandib. joint, but it could also be a grinding tooth, or teeth, or both, just something else- I just can’t say. I have felt/palpated her jaw, throat and neck pretty thoroughly, and I cannot find any irregularity, much less a mass or obstruction, and she doesn’t evidence any discomfort or tenderness when I do this, even when I apply pressure to the joint and the adjacent masseter muscle. As far as I can tell, her teeth remain (astoundingly) intact…indeed, she was able to give me quite a fierce little bite when I poked at her gums, though it was agitation, I think, not a response to a specific pain. Her gums appear pink and, I guess, normal…I just don’t see anything out of order, but then, I’m not a medical professional. There is this: Her breath seems unusually nasty (even for a cat). I haven’t anyone to assist me with her, so I cannot examine her really thoroughly, once she gets irritated and begins struggling.

    It seems that she ends up leaving as much as 1/2 of her food uneaten- although it is scattered in remnant bits on and around her dish, as if she tried, but couldn’t swallow it properly. I’m also quite concerned about dehydration. Maybe a year or so ago, when this behavior was apparent but still much less conspicuous than now, my veterinarian checked her mouth, gums, throat, etc., and found nothing at that time.

    Of course I intend to take her in for another exam, but those trips are REALLY traumatic for this particular cat, and, while I’m embarassed to admit this, I’m presently out of a job and just flat busted…as in eating Ramen noodles and drinking Sam”s Choice sody pop-broke..the cats eat better than me. I guess I was hoping that someone out there might perhaps recognize these symptoms from an experience of their own, or better yet, if some cat-savvy vet might be willing to suggest some additional diagnostic steps that I ought to take…any other things I should check or pay particular attention to? I wonder about the possibility of some sort of periodontal or possibly sinus infection, and even pondered giving her a course of (feline) Amoxicillin to see if there is any improvement. Anyway, if you’ve read this far, thank you for your perseverance.

    Oh, and while I guess that, strictly speaking, I am maybe one of those persons guilty of asking for free medical advice, I COMPLETELY understand and acknowledge that any veterinary professional kind enough to respond to my query CANNOT be expected diagnose or treat over the Internet, and while I am deeply greatful for any consideration, I do not expect a diagnosis, and of course any respondent is completely free from liability…held harmless…all those exceptions and caveats and whatnot that a physician’s lawyers probably like to hear.

    • ANSWER:
      You’re right it is impossible to diagnose your cat long distance, in spite of the detailed description you give, however, this sounds like it could be a dental problem. Without knowing details regarding the physical exam, and how thorough it was, its hard to know for sure. The results of any blood work,as well as how long ago it was performed, would also be helpful. There may be little to do regardless due to your pet’s very advanced age.


Feline Diet For Kidney Disease

Everyone who has the cat sick of hyperthyroidism only tries to find out the right treatment and oversees other important factors that can improve the condition. You should ask yourself what to feed your cat if it has feline hyperthyroidism, on a daily basis. That very moment when you realize that your cat is getting old day after day and her health conditions are changing you must take care of her more and give her only the best kind of food. Don’t wait until your cat gets sick, try to keep her healthy as much as possible.

1. Make the food – try to avoid the canned food, because it has so many chemicals that must keep it last for a long time. Some say the soy is the major ingredient in every canned food, and it can cause the hyperthyroidism. It is easy to remember that you must give your cat the poultry and the beef, but many vegetables should be avoided. If you can’t make the menu by yourself and you are wondering what to feed your cat if it has feline hyperthyroidism, the vet can do the daily plan for you, and you should just stick to it.

2. The remedies – they are not only helpful when your cat is expressing some health problems, they can be a great prevention and increase the quality of your cat’s lifestyle. The chamomile, lemon balm, and bladderwrack are just some of the herbs you can easily find or buy, and you can practically combine it however you want, and put it in the food, as well. Besides, the supplements of vitamins and minerals are “must”, especially for older cats.

3. Stick to the schedule – most cats start losing the weight when they are sick, or they start eating too much or lose appetite, so you should control their food intake. It is not only about what to feed your cat if it has feline hyperthyroidism; it’s about how to create the balanced meal that will contain all the nutrients your cat needs. That way, you can also be able to notice the symptoms of and changes in your cat’s body.

Today, it is not a problem to find out what to feed your cat if it has feline hyperthyroidism since every vet can give you the best plan, according to your cat’s health condition. The problem is how to make the plan into reality. To be realistic, make people can’t stick to their own diet, so how can we expect more responsibility when it comes to their cat.


Feline Chronic Renal Failure

Most people associate rabies with dogs. However, rabies in cats is much more common nowadays. This disease is caused by a virus that is almost always deadly.

Transmission

The virus that causes feline rabies is carried in the saliva of animals. These infected animals can transmit the disease to other mammals by biting them. This is the most common method of transmission. However, cats may also become infected if they have an open cut that allows the virus to enter their body. Some cats get the disease when they eat an animal that has the disease.

Symptoms

If your cat has this disease, he will be very irritable and excitable. Rabies in cats can also cause symptoms such as lack of appetite and seizures. As the disease progresses, it leads to paralysis of muscles. This paralysis causes respiratory distress and eventually death.
Diagnosis

Currently, there is one main method to diagnose feline rabies. The affected cat’s brain will have to be examined in a laboratory under a microscope. Obviously, this must be done after the animal has already died from the disease.

Treatment

Unfortunately, there is no treatment for rabies in cats. Once your cat begins to show symptoms, there is nothing you can do about it. Since the disease causes a very painful death, it is common for cats suspected of having the disease to be euthanized. It is very rare for any animal to survive a bout with this virus.

Prevention

The best way to prevent feline rabies is to have your cat vaccinated. In most parts of the United States, it is require by law. You should have him vaccinated at three months of age and again when he turns one year old. When your cat reaches two years old, he will likely receive a booster shot that remains effective for three years. You should also try to limit your cat’s exposure to wild animals that may carry the virus.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Does dry food cause feline chronic renal failure?
    My sweet 9 yr old kitty was just diagnosed with chronic renal failure.
    I am in total shock and panicking, even though it seems that we have caught it relatively early (creatinine 196, usg1.040).
    Is the fact that I have fed her mostly (high quality!) dry food the cause of this? I read something along those lines on the internet. I feel so guilty. Does anyone know anything about this?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a cat die of renal failure at 16. My vet said that an all dry diet contributes to the probability of this happening. Cats don’t drink enough anyway, and tend to run dehydrated if they only eat dry food. Don’t feel guilty, it is something new that is just coming to light. If you caught it in time, you may have to give her subcutaneous fluid injections for the rest of her life.

  2. QUESTION:
    Feline Chronic Renal Failure?
    My 9 year-old cat just got diagnosed with feline CRF. When I took him to the vet his creatinine level was at an 11 and the’m very got it down to 5 but now I have him at home and just began giving him the iv fluids, an antibiotic, Renal K+ supplement and special food. I’m very worried about him and his comfort/health, especially since he seems to hate the medication. I love him very much and this has been hard on the both of us. Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there… I’m so sorry to hear that your cat was diagnosed with CRF. I’d like to offer you some helpful resources so that you can help not only yourself, but your kitty as well.

      The following websites offers a tremendous amount of information to help you understand the stages of progression of CRF as well as offer tips on how to provide the best care through each of these stages and when to know it’s time to give him your blessings to say g’bye.

      Understanding Feline CRF & how to manage it through diet and medication: http://felinecrf.com/

      Online support groups for owners of CRF cats:

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/FelineCRF/

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/feline-crf-info/

  3. QUESTION:
    Blood test and Feline renal failure?
    I ‘ve been doing some research for my cat (6 yrs) , and I’ve read that feline chronic renal failure cannot be detected until 70% of renal function is lost, does this mean that the blood test WILL NOT be able to detect developing CRF, or if i should keep an eye on his kidney function?

    • ANSWER:
      Creatinine and BUN are the two most important elements of the blood test for cats with CRF. When these are elevated and the urine is dilute, there is a very real possibility that the cat is in CRF. When the creatinine and BUN are elevated, it is likely that approximately 70% of kidney function is already gone.

      The veterinarian can however detect early renal failure from the other blood values related toCRDF, here are some:

      Amylase – Some vets feel that slightly elevated Amylase levels can sometimes be a pre-cursor to CRF before other symptoms occur.

      BUN (blood urea nitrogen) – is a waste product excreted through the kidneys. BUN is more reflective of dietary impacts than creatinine. An increase in BUN can also be due to dehydration (a symptom of CRF and many other diseases and syndromes).

      Cholesterol – Increases in cholesterol levels may occur with kidney disease.

      Creatinine – is a waste product excreted through the kidneys. It is indicative of overall declining kidney function.

      Calcium – A healthy cat will have a calcium to phosphorus ratio of 1:1 to 2:1. Since damaged kidneys cannot adequately process phosphorus, calcium levels must rise to compensate.

      PCV (Packed Cell Volume) or HCT (hematocrit) – This number is watched carefully as it is indicative of anemia which is common in CRF cats. In this test the blood sample is centrifuged to separate the blood cells from the fluid portion (serum) of the blood. The volume of the cells is measured as a percentage of the total sample. Normally, 40% of the cat’s blood consists of cells and the rest is liquid.

      Phosphorus – During CRF, high levels of phosphorus accumulate in the blood (hyperphosphatemia) because the kidneys can no longer efficiently excrete it. Excess phosphorus intake can make CRF worse. Phosphorus levels should be monitored on a regular basis.

      Potassium levels are critical in CRF cats and should be regularly monitored. Potassium loss can result from frequent vomiting and in urination. Sub-Q therapy may also dilute potassium even further. Low potassium is called hypokalemia. Even if your cat’s potassium is in the low normal range, it may be necessary to give him a potassium supplement. This is because with CRF, critical stored potassium in the tissues is used, often making the blood analysis appear normal.

      Sodium should be monitored closely as the kidneys of CRF cats are unable to excrete sufficient quantities of it. This may result in hypertension.

      Routine (annually) blood work, urinalysis and physical exam will be the key in keeping your feline friend healthy.

  4. QUESTION:
    My cat was diagnosed with feline chronic renal failure (kidney failure) about 5 months ago. Resources/support?
    It’s not a question of if my cat is sick, but how severely.
    Our family cat that passed 6 years ago didn’t show signs of discomfort or pain until she was dying, and the euthanasia was very difficult because her body had already started to shut down and her veins collapsed.
    My cat started throwing up a while ago (she is ten years old, and had always seemed very healthy before that) and blood tests showed she had f.c.r.f. The stress of taking her to the vet and the iv for liquids stressed her out, more like traumatized her than just stress, and she went downhill within a few days and almost died. We were able to find a vet who helped us get her better at home without meds, but she recently started throwing up again, has lost her appetite but is more thirsty, is urinating like crazy, her eyes that were a vibrant green with a bit of blue are now a dull green, and the major thing is she accidently urinated while she was asleep yesterday. From the research I’ve done, “leaking” is a flag for kidney failure, and I don’t have the money (literally) to do any kind of treatments (I’m paying my way through college right now on my own).

    My cat has been like my shadow, inseperable, since we got her as a kitten when I was ten. I feel like she is a part of me, and I know she is not healthy, although she would seem ok to someone who doesn’t know her. My worst fear is for her condition to worsen to the point where she is in a lot of pain, and for the euthanasia to be painful or difficult.

    I have a phone appointment with the vet this afternoon, but if anyone knows of any websites with advice or similar stories, I would really appreciate it. I am looking for some support, and to make sure I do what is best for her.
    Thanks, I will definitely look at those groups.
    Unfortunately, when she first got sick and diagnosed, we tried the tablet for naseau but she would not take it, even in her favorite treats or crushed into food. We also tried the at home IV thing to hydrate her, but even that made her panic and we didn’t see any improvement. After a while, it was clear they were making her more stressed and just feeling worse, we were finally able to get her relatively healthy by changing her diet (to canned food mixed with water).

    • ANSWER:
      There are some very good CRF cat groups over on yahooGroups, just put the term in the search field. There’s also been discussion on it over on the Handicats group over there, so there are a lot of owners familiar with the reactions.

      Has your vet suggested a 1/4 tablet of Pepcid A/C for settling the stomach? It’s safe for cats. Phone and ask them. Has your vet taught you how to syringe water into your cat or give fluids? It’s do-able at home and extremely helpful for the cat to be hydrated without the stress.

      There’s also several very good CRF sites online, google CRF feline and you;ll find it.
      Here’s one — http://www.felinecrf.com/

  5. QUESTION:
    What are some good sites/brands for feline renal diet cat food? My cat needs a wide variety & eats only dry?
    My cat has chronic renal (kidney) failure and often gets sick of his food. It’s really important that he eats. Any good sites that have a wide variety of renal diet cat food? I would buy a bunch of different kinds and keep switching it around. He won’t eat canned, only dry.

    If you don’t know any sites can you tell me what brand you’ve personally given to your cat? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to get him off the dry food. It’s like pouring gasoline on a fire to feed him that. My cat also has CRF. When we first found out, the vet gave him Hill’s K/D. He hated the food and I hated the fact it was so low in protein. I decided to feed him better protein instead of less so I tried Wellness. It worked wonders. I now do a rotation of Wellness, EVO, and Blue Buffalo. He has made remarkable improvements with it.

  6. QUESTION:
    Euthanasia and mourning?
    I feel the end is near with my young cat who was diagnosed with feline chronic renal failure in November of 2008. I just don’t know if I can be there when they do it, like I’m letting them kill him.I’m trying to prepare myself for it, but I’m predicting afterwords that I’ll never want another cat or never feel the same. I want to treasure his memory, but I can’t stand the fact of remembrance tearing me up on the inside. How have any of you dealt with it?
    Becky, we too have two cats that are brother and sister and the one that is sick is the brother. =( All have replies have been very kind, thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      One of my dogs is nearing the end and knowing doesn’t make it any easier. Fortunately my dog doesn’t seem to be in any pain so we’re just letting him decided what he wants to do unless it gets to the point that he simply has poor quality of life, in which case I will be there when he needs to go. I work in a city animal shelter so unfortunately we get the strays and undesirables from five different cities and sometimes they need to be put down. It’s really very peaceful and the animals just fall asleep, it’s effectively an overdose of anesthetic. I’m going to be there because I would feel like I cheated my boy if I wasn’t if it comes to needing him euthanized. You do whatever you feel is right, and in time you’ll want another pet.

      It hurts and it’s hard and you’ll think you never want another animal again because how could you set yourself up for it when you know you’ll be getting at most a couple of decades before they have to go, but those years in between? Worth every minute of it because they were loved, and loved you. Give it time, you’ll forgive yourself because you did the best you could do for him.

  7. QUESTION:
    My cat has been making sad and mournful cries at varying times of the day. He is a neutered 15 year old.?
    He is in good health, as he has been to the vet twice since September, with blood tests (we were concerned about Feline Chronic Renal Failure, but all levels were good). He’s loving and doesn’t seem to be acting any differently other than the caterwauling. Sometimes he will walk away after being fed, petted or otherwise interacted with and start these sounds. He could be less than 10 feet away from us when this happens, or on the other side of the house. Sometimes he’ll wake us up the middle of the night. If we call out to him, (ie “Baby, we’re here”) he’ll stop. He has access to us, food, water, litter box and toys. My vet is unconcerned, but the noise is rather irritating. Any help or suggestions?
    Yes, he does sleep with us, but only for part of the night. He likes to get up, go to other parts of the house to sleep. He is a really affectionate cat and likes being with us (three person household).

    • ANSWER:
      He’s a pretty old cat. Perhaps his eyesight or sense of smell is going bad and he is finding himself in confusing situations. Hearing you call to him could comfort and reassure him.

  8. QUESTION:
    mouth ulcers?
    Hi was on today about my cat well went to the vets just some info on what i was talking about. just wondering if anyone had a cat with a mouth ulcers? my cat this morning was very not him self My cat this morning looking not to good is mouth is open little bit with is tongue out a little. also there drools from is mouth

    I took him to the vet to see they said that could be a mouth ulces and they took a blood test. they said might have Feline Chronic Renal Failure.

    Also give him to meds Colvasone50ml and synulox rtu injection
    Got to go back tomorrow.

    • ANSWER:
      I almost didn’t look at this because I know nothing about mouth ulcers. Your vet said crf and that is what you should be concerned with. You do not want to feed the vet’s food. If the vet said might have crf then you fo not need to follow everything in this post except about nutrtion. Best of luck

      If your cat is not in final stages, this is not want you want to do. You do not want to put your cat on the
      Vets low protein diet. There are simply so many better options out there than to hand the poor cat a low amount of poor quality protein – which often results in a poor appetite and muscle wasting since the body is now robbing its own muscle mass to feed itself a decent quality and amount of protein.
      . There are new thoughts on this and the thinking is it is not the amount of protein but the quality of protein that matters.
      The Merck veterinary manual [www.merckvetmanual.com] says that cats need “4 g of protein of high biologic value per kg body wt/day”. That’s about 7 calories from protein per pound body weight per day. If a cat isn’t a good eater and consumes, say, 20 calories per pound per day, then 7/20 = 35% of calories can safely be from protein. It must be high quality protein, which means meat, fish, milk, and eggs, and not grain or soy.

      I am under the assumption that you have been feeding mostly dry foods. Many use a vegetable based protein instead of animal and that is part of the problem.. Your cat needs protein as it is a carnivore and cutting down on it will lead to other health issues and may cause faster degeneration.
      You want to cut down on phosphorous (no fish allowed now)

      The best way to do this is with a raw diet which you can make yourself or buy. (Making yourself is better) link provided at the bottom
      If you are unwilling to do that then something like the non fish flavors of Wellness or Merrick with NO grains are good alternatives. Wysong is also a good canned choice. This list gives a breakdown. Remember you want low phosphorous

      http://www.geocities.com/jmpeerson/CanFoodOld.html

      You should be giving sub-Q fluids as needed.

      You also will want to look into phosphorous binders. Something like aluminum hydroxide
      Ask your vet or look into calcitrol

      You may want to talk to the vet about having injectable Pepcid AC on hand or you can buy it in pill form (ac not plain pepcid) and give 1/4 tab for stomach upset which happens a lot in crf cats due to acid in the stomach.
      I hope this stuff helps, here are many links for you
      Making cat food

      http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm

      other links. Read, read, read!!!!

      http://www.felineoutreach.org/EducationDetail.asp?cat=KidneyDisease

      http://www.marvistavet.com/html/kidney_failure_where_to_begin.html

      http://www.felinecrf.org/

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/FelineCRF/?v=1&t=search&ch=web&pub=groups&sec=group&slk=3

      http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-Phosphorus-Management/?v=1&t=search&ch=web&pub=groups&sec=group&slk=5

      About that vets diet. This report is for dogs but applies to cats

      http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Opera/21…

  9. QUESTION:
    Is there a feline vasodilator that won’t affect the kidneys?
    My cat has Chronic Renal Failure and has now developed a heart murmur, the vasodilator the vet put her on is hard on the kidneys.

    • ANSWER:
      If possible you should follow up with a cardiologist. Although the vasodilator might be necessary it may not be the best medication for your cat depending on how severe the renal failure is. It is always best to weigh the contraindications of medications with the amount of good they are doing.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why do cats get CRF/ kidney failure?
    Why do cats more commonly experience CRF (chronic renal failure, kidney failure) vs. humans? I know the science, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment, etc, etc, but why are felines in particular prone to this disease? Just curious.

    • ANSWER:
      It really goes to their diet. Cat food is full of filler lacking nutrition.


Feline Acute Kidney Disease

Kidney infection or Pyelonephritis is a bacterial infection that starts will bladder infection. An individual gets inflicted with the disease due to decreased immunity against germs and bacteria. The acute infection starts with minor symptoms which disappear after some time. However, the symptoms are highly painful during chronic upper urinary tract infections.

Several men suffer from kidney infections due to enlarged prostate or urinary tract abnormalities. Initially, you will experience urinary problems which can lead to kidney damage. At times, the infection can travel into the bloodstreams which can be life threatening. Hence, you need to detect the symptoms of kidney infections as soon as possible, so that you can undergo an effective treatment.

Hence, UTI infected men can notice the given below symptoms.

1. You can feel the urge to urinate over and over again. This phenomenon is predominant during the night.

2. Some of you can experience pain or burning sensation before, after or during the urinary secretion. At times, the pain can be unbearable.

3. The inflammation of kidneys is accompanied by swelling and builds up of fluids near the kidneys. Hence, these changes lead to severe pain in the abdomen.

4. You can also experience pain in the genital parts, buttocks and back.

5. The bacterium responsible for the bladder infections can lead to high fever under adverse condition.

6. The infection requires immediate treatment, if you notice samples of blood or urine in the urine secretion.

7. The bacterial infection can also lead to fatigue, dehydration or vomiting.

Hence, you should consult a doctor as soon as you experience the pain associated with the disease. Most of the doctors recommend an antibiotic treatment for the disease. You can also use home remedies to ward off kidney infections. So, undergo a treatment now to eliminate the infection from your body.

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Famous People On Dialysis Kidney Disease

Did you realize that autism affects approximately 6 out of every 1000 people? Those numbers are actually staggering when you think about how much they have increased in the past several years. Even though autism can leave a person unable to deal with life at all, some people have a form of autism that allows them to live a life that is fairly normal. In fact, there are plenty of famous people with autism that you may not have ever realized had the disease.

One of the most famous people with autism, by today’s standards, is Daryl Hannah. She is an actress in America that has played some very high profile roles in movies throughout her life. Some of these movies have included Blade Runner, Kill Bill and Splash. She was diagnosed as a child as having autism, or more specifically being borderline autistic and has been able to develop to the point where she can function in society quite regularly.
Also on the list of famous people with autism are many individuals that you may not recognize. They include names such as Christopher Knowles, Katherine McCarran, Sue Rubin and Robert Gango. These individuals all have different levels of autism and range in their abilities from actors and actresses to authors and high school basketball players. Some of them have even played autistic individuals in movies, even when they had no oral skills whatsoever.

It is also interesting to note that some of the famous people with autism actually are quite revered for their intellect. An individual who was not only an author and a poet but also revered as a philosopher was Tito Mukhopadhyay. It is true that some individuals with autism have a unique ability to be able to see through and recognize certain things that others may not recognize because they are obvious.

There are other names on the list of famous people with autism, many of them that you would never even recognize had a problem with the disease. It gives many of us hope that someday our own loved ones may be able to overcome their problems and live normal or even high-achiever life styles.

Becoming famous and successful despite having autism is extremely difficult and these exceptional individuals should be honored and looked to for inspiration. However, for everyone who has become famous there are hundreds, if not thousands, of others who have overcome autism and achieved personal success in their lives without most of us having ever heard of them. These people should be applauded as well.

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